boron


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bo·ron (B),

(bōr'on),
A nonmetallic trivalent element, atomic no. 5, atomic wt. 10.811; occurs as a hard crystalline mass or as a brown powder; forms borates and boric acid.
[Pers. Burah]

boron

/bo·ron/ (B) (bor´on) a chemical element, at. no. 5.

boron (B)

[bôr′on]
a nonmetallic element, whose atomic number is 5; its atomic mass is 10.81. Elemental boron occurs in the form of dark crystals and as a greenish yellow amorphous mass. Certain concentrations of this element are toxic to plant and animal life, but plants need traces of boron for normal growth. It is the characteristic element of boric acid, which is used chiefly as a dusting powder and ointment for minor skin disorders. Boric acid in solution was formerly extensively used as an antiinfective and eyewash, but the high incidence of toxic reactions and fatalities associated with these preparations has greatly reduced their use.

boron

A trivalent nonmetallic element, (atomic number 5; atomic weight 10.81).
 
Alternative medicine
Boron is believed by alternative health workers to be useful in pregnancy and menopause as it increases oestrogens; they also believe in boron deficiency.

Boron-rich foods
Almonds, beans, honey, lentils, peas, peaches, pears and raisins.
 
Molecular biology
A mutation of SLC4A11, which encodes a transporter that regulates intracellular boron levels, results in congenital endothelial dystrophy type 2, a rare form of corneal dystrophy.
 
Nutrition
Boron is non-toxic to humans; while boron is needed for certain cellular activities, a boron deficiency state is not known to exist.

Physics
Boron is used in physics as a neutron-absorber.
 
Physiology
Boron is a trace mineral needed for proper absorption and utilisation of calcium to maintain bone density, and may help prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis; daily supplements of boron may help retain dietary calcium, magnesium and phosphorus, and increase production of oestrogen and testosterone. It is also thought to safely promote muscle growth by body-builders.

bo·ron

(B) (bōr'on)
A nonmetallic trivalent element, atomic no. 5, atomic wt. 10.811; occurs as a hard crystalline mass or as a brown powder, and forms borates and boric acid. A nutritional need has been reported in pregnant women.
[Pers. Burah ]

boron,

n an element/mineral found in grains, nuts, leafy greens, and (noncitrus) fruits, used in the treatment of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis and in the prevention of prostate cancer. Precaution should be taken by women at risk for hormone-sensitive cancers and for patients who are undergoing hormone replacement therapy for the estrogen-elevating effects.

boron

a chemical element, atomic number 5, atomic weight 10.811, symbol B. See Table 6.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 additional servings of fruit and one additional serving of nuts per day compared to those in the lowest boron intake group.
The boron trifluoride global market report 2015 key points:
We say to the researchers: Get back to us on the boron, and make sure the Hope Diamond is back in its museum display case by morning.
The resulting runoff can be analyzed for boron content, and the boards can be individually analyzed for boron between rain cycles.
For the optimal application of the boron nitride mold coating with magnesium (9 degrees Baume density, mold at 400F), the wear rate is about 1 micrometer/pour.
The interaction between boron compounds and potassium and chlorine also needs further study to establish more generally the expected changes in the smelt and superheater deposit melting properties.
b) At present, there is no way to routinely determine tissue boron concentrations during BNCT.
is working on new surface treatments that allow boron nitride (BN) to be loaded at high enough levels and maintain good moldability, says marketing director Don Lelonis.
At the same time, several reports have indicated a health concern over the negative effects boron may have on the male reproductive system.
Although cobalt boron acylate alone can take care of good adhesion in normal conditions as well as under salt aging or steam aging conditions even at elevated temperature, to maintain the physicals as well as adhesion properties in anaerobic aging condition, it is essential to have a suitable network structure which can be achieved by using specialty chemicals like post vulcanization stabilizer (PVS) such as hexamethylene-l,6-bisthio sulfate disodium salt dihydrate (HTSNa) and bis-(3-triethoxy silylpropyl) tetrasulfide (TESPT).
This experimental effort, called boron neutron capture therapy, involves a highly complex process of getting boron into cancer cells and then irradiating them with a beam of low-energy neutrons.