borderline

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borderline

 [bor´der-lĭn″]
1. of a phenomenon, straddling the dividing line between two categories.
2. a term used in psychiatry for personality disorders originally viewed as being on the border between psychosis and neurosis. See borderline personality disorder.
borderline personality disorder a personality disorder marked by various features of borderline personality organization, such as instability, impulsiveness, intense or poorly controlled anger, inability to tolerate being alone, and chronic feelings of emptiness. Affected individuals sometimes seem to be on the borderline of psychosis and are highly unstable in mood, behavior, self-image, and affect. None of the features of the condition are constant; behavior is highly unpredictable and such persons seldom achieve their full potential. Their interpersonal relationships are often stormy because of their shifts in attitude and their tendency to idealize, devalue, or manipulate others. Suicidal gestures and self-mutilation sometimes occur with this disorder. The American Psychiatric Association has published Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, which is printed on their web site at http://www.psych.org.

borderline

/bor·der·line/ (-līn) of a phenomenon, straddling the dividing line between two categories.

borderline

(bôr′dər-līn′)
n.
1. A line that establishes or marks a border.
2. An indefinite area intermediate between two qualities or conditions: The borderline between love and hate is often thin.
3. Informal A person with borderline personality disorder.
adj.
1.
a. Verging on a given quality or condition: borderline poverty.
b. Of a questionable nature or quality: an applicant with borderline qualifications.
2. Psychiatry Of, related to, or having borderline personality disorder.

borderline

Etymology: OFr, bordure + L, linea
pertaining to a state of health in which the patient has some of the signs and symptoms of a disease but not enough to justify a definite diagnosis.

borderline

An adjectival expediency widely used in medicine for any condition that cannot be neatly placed in one of usually 2 categories (e.g., benign vs malignant), each of which has a distinct clinical significance to therapy and prognosis. In clinical medicine, pre- is usually affixed to the condition, as in prehypertension or pre-diabetes; in pathology, the phrase “of uncertain malignant potential” is generally preferred.

borderline

 An adjectival expediency widely used in medicine for any condition that cannot be neatly placed in one of usually 2 categories, each of which has a distinct clinical significance, therapy and prognosis
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings point to "a real, albeit limited role' for neuroleptics in treating borderline patients, psychiatrist John G.
And as we progressed further, many psychiatrists, psychoanalysts, and psychotherapists began using the term borderline to describe patients with a specific type of mental organization--those who were primitive and disorganized--thereby separating the borderline concept from schizophrenia.
Research in the area is increasing, but the evidence base for drug treatment is still far smaller for borderline than for other psychiatric disorders.
I have never seen a borderline patient who is only borderline," Dr.
Plainly a borderline closed curve of the figure which has the hole surrounds inwardly all figures except the figure itself and figures which its other borderline closed curves surround inwardly respectively; yet the borderline closed curve surrounds outwardly the figure and those figures which the other borderline closed curves surround inwardly respectively, therefore we need merely to prove all figures at a planar map from any spherical map, to wit O.
We regret to say that most Iranian phases are located on the sidelines of the field, contrary to those of "Qatar", instead of being located on the borderlines common with "Qatar".
Charles Schulz said at the meeting, where he led an interest group discussion on drug therapy for borderline personality disorder.
I'm particularly pleased to be part of the Mindful States exhibition as any opportunity to shed some light on the more taboo symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder is really worthwhile.
author of the best-selling, I Hate You-Don't Leave Me-Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder; Richard Moskovitz, M.
One moment calm and engaging, the next tempestuous and combative, borderlines bewilder those around them, straining relationships to the breaking point.
Noting the "Split Risk" sign, I opened the door to my new ward, Emerson 2, Borderlines, with caution, shielded the opening with my body, back-flipped in fast and threw the door closed.

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