borderline personality disorder


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Related to borderline personality disorder: histrionic personality disorder, Narcissistic personality disorder

borderline

 [bor´der-lĭn″]
1. of a phenomenon, straddling the dividing line between two categories.
2. a term used in psychiatry for personality disorders originally viewed as being on the border between psychosis and neurosis. See borderline personality disorder.
borderline personality disorder a personality disorder marked by various features of borderline personality organization, such as instability, impulsiveness, intense or poorly controlled anger, inability to tolerate being alone, and chronic feelings of emptiness. Affected individuals sometimes seem to be on the borderline of psychosis and are highly unstable in mood, behavior, self-image, and affect. None of the features of the condition are constant; behavior is highly unpredictable and such persons seldom achieve their full potential. Their interpersonal relationships are often stormy because of their shifts in attitude and their tendency to idealize, devalue, or manipulate others. Suicidal gestures and self-mutilation sometimes occur with this disorder. The American Psychiatric Association has published Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, which is printed on their web site at http://www.psych.org.

bor·der·line per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern that begins by early adulthood and is characterized by impulsivity and unpredictability, unstable interpersonal relationships, inappropriate or uncontrolled affect, especially anger, identity disturbances, rapid shifts of mood, suicidal acts, self-mutilations, job and marital instability, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, and intolerance of being alone.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

borderline personality disorder

n. Abbr. BPD
A personality disorder characterized by impulsiveness and by a long-standing pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, behavior, mood, and self-image, with symptoms often including intense anger and fear of abandonment.

borderline personality disorder

A prolonged disturbance of personality function in a person (usually understood to mean over age 18 years), characterised by unstable moods and unsatisfactory personal relationships, impulsivity, substance abuse, depression, anxiety and fear of abandonment.

Borderline Personality Disorder
1. Frantic efforts to prevent real or imagined abandonment.
2. A pattern of intense and unstable interpersonal relationships swinging between extremes of idealisation and devaluation.
3. Unstable self-image.
4. Impulsivity in 2+ areas and self-destructive potential (e.g., binge eating, driving, gambling, sexual relations, substance abuse).
5. Recurring suicidal or self-mutilating gestures or behaviours.
6. Marked lability of moods and affect.
7. Chronic feeling of “emptiness”.
8. Inappropriate anger and inability to control anger.
9. Transient stress-related paranoid ideation or dissociative symptoms.

borderline personality disorder

Psychiatry A disorder of adult onset, which is characterized by instable interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affect, impulsivity in various contexts, and fluctuations in intense moods
Borderline Personality Disorder
  1. Frantic efforts to prevent real or imagined abandonment
  2. A pattern of intense and unstable interpersonal relationships swinging between extremes of idealization and devaluation
  3. Unstable self-image
  4. Impulsivity in 2+ areas & self-destructive potential, eg binge eating, driving, gambling, sexual relations, substance abuse
  5. Recurring suicidal or self-mutilating gestures or behaviors
  6. Marked lability of moods and affect
  7. Chronic feeling of 'emptiness'
  8. Inappropriate anger and inability to control anger
  9. Transient stress-related paranoid ideation or dissociative symptoms

bor·der·line per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(bōr'dĕr-līn pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental disorder in which the symptoms are not continually psychotic yet are not strictly neurotic: may include impulsivity and unpredictability, unstable interpersonal relationships, inappropriate or uncontrolled anger, identity disturbances, rapid shifts of mood, suicidal acts, self-mutilations, job and marital instability, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, and intolerance of being alone.

borderline personality disorder

A psychiatric disorder intermediate between normality and genuine psychiatric illness. A person with a borderline disorder is impulsive, often aggressive, with unexpected swings of emotion from depression to elation and a tendency to regard others as enemies.

Borderline personality disorder (BPD)

A pattern of behavior characterized by impulsive acts, intense but chaotic relationships with others, identity problems, and emotional instability.
Mentioned in: Self-Mutilation
References in periodicals archive ?
Epidemiology, diagnosis and comorbidity of borderline personality disorder.
DBT for borderline personality disorder with severe posttraumatic stress disorder after childhood sexual abuse (DBT-PTSD; Steil, Dyer, Priebe, Kleindienst, & Bohus, 2011), for example, was developed to meet the unique needs of individuals with comorbid BPD and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) secondary to childhood sexual abuse.
Recognition of facial affect in Borderline Personality Disorder.
Mentalization based treatment for borderline personality disorder, World Psychiatry 2010; 9: 11-15
Borderline personality disorder patients can indeed be frustrating to treat, remarked Jerome Wakefield, a social worker at New York University who has criticized DSM for incorporating normal forms of sadness into the definition of depression.
Considering that Negative Urgency and Lack of Premeditation are both associated with borderline personality traits (Tragesser & Robinson, 2009), it could be expected that Lack of Premeditation would also relate to dysfunctional beliefs associated with borderline personality disorder.
patients with BD versus controls, patients with BD and a history of suicidality versus patients with BD without said history of suicidality and patients with BD and borderline personality disorder versus those without borderline personality disorder).
Impact of trait impulsivity and state aggression on divalproex versus placebo response in borderline personality disorder.
Construct validity and prevalence rate of borderline personality disorder among Chinese adolescents.
I'm not an expert, but from what I've read on Borderline Personality Disorder it kind of fitted with her," the relative added.
STEPPS is based on a program developed by Norman Bartels and Teresa Crotty called "A Systems Approach to Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder.
The DSM-IV authors defined borderline personality disorder as a persistent pattern of instability and impulsivity.

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