bordered pit


Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Bordered pitclick for a larger image
Fig. 78 Bordered pit . Bordered pits in the tracheids of vascular plants.

bordered pit

a communicating channel between cells, found in the VESSELS (2) and TRACHEIDS of higher vascular plants. See Fig. 78 .
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, a number of species in various genera of the angiosperms have been observed to have bordered pit pairs possessing an impermeable torus as well as a surrounding margo with openings the size of the pit membrane of typical angiosperms rather than the larger openings of the margos of gymnosperms.
Bordered pit pairs connect water-conducting tracheary elements of vascular plants and allow water transport from one element to the next.
The bordered pit pairs often appear empty (without a partitioning membrane) in cross-sections viewed with the light microscope (Fig 3).
In transverse sections, narrow diameter tracheary elements primarily appeared clustered in the latewood and, in such instances, bordered pit pairs with tori were observed on both radial and tangential walls (Fig.
The ultrastructure of southern pine bordered pit membranes as revealed by specialized drying techniques.
In spruce sapwood, bordered pits of the first formed earlywood cell rows become irreversibly closed when sapwood is dried at ambient conditions (Fig.
All imperforate tracheary elements are moderately thin-walled septate fibers, with small simple or vestigially bordered pits (Fig.
Pitted (post-expansion) tracheary elements with bordered pits would provide enhanced support by increasing the amount of secondary wall surface (Carlquist 2012).
They observed that the fibers were non-libriform, septate, with long tapering and numerous simple or bordered pits.
Tracheids with conspicuous bordered pits occur in Forchhammeria (Fig.
Within the "paleoherb" families, the Saururaceae and Aristolochiaceae are polymorphic for this character, and the phylogenetic context provided by these cladograms implies that the distinctly bordered pits in some Saururaceae and Aristolochiaceae represent reversals.