borage


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to borage: borage oil

borage

/bor·age/ (bor´ij) Borago officinalis or preparations of its flowers, stems, and seeds, which are used in folk medicine for a wide variety of disorders; see also under oil.

borage

(bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

borage

an annual herb found in North America and Europe.
uses This herb is used as an antiinflammatory for premenstrual syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Raynaud's disease, and other inflammatory conditions. It is also used to treat atopic dermatitis, infant cradle cap, cystic fibrosis, high blood pressure, and diabetes; effectiveness is not proven.
contraindications Should not be used since it is likely unsafe when used in amounts ingested for medicinal purpose.

borage

Herbal medicine
A mucilaginous annual herb, which contains essential oils, mucilage, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and tanning, and is antipyretic, a mucilage and demulcent. Borage is used by naturopaths to regulate metabolism and hormones, and is believed to be useful for gynaecologic problems including PMS/PMT and menopause.

Toxicity
May be harmful in large doses, given its known liver toxicity; carcinogenic potential.

Pseudomedicine
A floral essence said to provide buoyant courage and optimism.

bor·age

(bōr'ăj)
A herbal prepared from the plant parts and seeds of Borago officinalis. Value as antiinflammatory and tonic. Clinically studied for its value in dermatology; possible use in hepatic and GI disorders. Plant contains toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
Synonym(s): beebread, ox's tongue, starflower.
[L.L. burrago, fr. burra, shaggy cloth]

borage (bōrˑ·j),

n Latin name:
Borage officinalis; parts used: seeds, stems, leaves; uses: arthritis, hypertension, common cold, bronchitis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children. May cause hepatotoxicity. Also called
beebread, common borage, cool tankard, star flower, and
ox's tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the obtained results, it is specified that the compost cares had the highest effect on the quantity features of the borage significantly and the effect of the type of the biophosphorous composts and vermin compost is different on the quality of borage.
Tomatoes - are beneficial for roses, asparagus and capsicums, also enjoy the company of carrots, parsley, basil, oregano, marigolds, alliums, petunias, borage, nasturtiums and geraniums but dislike corn, fennel, potatoes, dill, beetroot, Brassicas and rosemary.
The juicy red, veggie-fruit thrives in the company of onions, mint, parsley, marigolds, basil, carrots, borage and Gus.
But after a heated debate, a corrected result with Hedsor Borage the winner was announced.
Examples are borage oil, evening primrose oil, flax seed oil and CLA (a new and unique fatty acid).
When the borage plants blossom in a profusion of fragrantly blue-floreted stars, beneficial insects (the pollinators) are attracted to them in great numbers.
Evening primrose oil and borage oil are the two primary commercial sources of GLA, containing 10 percent and 20 percent GLA respectively.
The percent of borage inflorescence nitrogen was measured using Kejldahl method made in German [19] Gerhardt model.
Phacelia is a borage with deep roots and flowers attractive to pollinators.
New Parrot Head Advanced Sun Care contains a proprietary moisturizing base called Aloe Hydrating Complex, which contains vitamins and other natural ingredients including olive squalane, borage, hemp, brazil nut, avocado, calendula, chamomile, comfrey and carrot.
Dead heading angelica, borage, dill, evening primrose, fennel, garlic chives and lemon balm prevents self-seeding.
Melt a teaspoon of this in a pan and add some olive oil and 5ml borage oil.