borage


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Related to borage: borage oil

borage

/bor·age/ (bor´ij) Borago officinalis or preparations of its flowers, stems, and seeds, which are used in folk medicine for a wide variety of disorders; see also under oil.

borage

(bôr′ĭj, bŏr′-)
n.
An annual bristly herb (Borago officinalis) native to the Mediterranean region, having blue or purplish star-shaped flowers, edible leaves and stems, and seeds containing oil used as a dietary supplement.

borage

an annual herb found in North America and Europe.
uses This herb is used as an antiinflammatory for premenstrual syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Raynaud's disease, and other inflammatory conditions. It is also used to treat atopic dermatitis, infant cradle cap, cystic fibrosis, high blood pressure, and diabetes; effectiveness is not proven.
contraindications Should not be used since it is likely unsafe when used in amounts ingested for medicinal purpose.

borage

Herbal medicine
A mucilaginous annual herb, which contains essential oils, mucilage, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and tanning, and is antipyretic, a mucilage and demulcent. Borage is used by naturopaths to regulate metabolism and hormones, and is believed to be useful for gynaecologic problems including PMS/PMT and menopause.

Toxicity
May be harmful in large doses, given its known liver toxicity; carcinogenic potential.

Pseudomedicine
A floral essence said to provide buoyant courage and optimism.

bor·age

(bōr'ăj)
A herbal prepared from the plant parts and seeds of Borago officinalis. Value as antiinflammatory and tonic. Clinically studied for its value in dermatology; possible use in hepatic and GI disorders. Plant contains toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
Synonym(s): beebread, ox's tongue, starflower.
[L.L. burrago, fr. burra, shaggy cloth]

borage (bōrˑ·j),

n Latin name:
Borage officinalis; parts used: seeds, stems, leaves; uses: arthritis, hypertension, common cold, bronchitis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children. May cause hepatotoxicity. Also called
beebread, common borage, cool tankard, star flower, and
ox's tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the obtained results, it is specified that the compost cares had the highest effect on the quantity features of the borage significantly and the effect of the type of the biophosphorous composts and vermin compost is different on the quality of borage.
According to the company, borage oil is the richest known source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a fatty acid used by the skin to prevent water loss.
The juicy red, veggie-fruit thrives in the company of onions, mint, parsley, marigolds, basil, carrots, borage and Gus.
ShiKai Borage Dry Skin Therapy provides people who suffer from chronic dry skin with a safe, effective, nonprescription treatment option that is clinically proven to work," says Dennis Sepp, the company's founder and president.
Most racegoers believed Hedsor Borage to have got up close home to score, and were shocked when Jims Brindle was announced as the winner.
Borage seed oil may help reduce dry skin and itching associated with aging.
Examples are borage oil, evening primrose oil, flax seed oil and CLA (a new and unique fatty acid).
When the borage plants blossom in a profusion of fragrantly blue-floreted stars, beneficial insects (the pollinators) are attracted to them in great numbers.
Evening primrose oil and borage oil are the two primary commercial sources of GLA, containing 10 percent and 20 percent GLA respectively.
Former Tomorrow's World presenter JUDITH HANN, who now runs herb courses, shows you how X-TOMORROW'S World presenter Judith Hann used to spend her time in a TV Estudio, but these days she's out in her garden, growing more than 150 culinary herbs including borage, sweet cicely and others which taste great but aren't widely available in supermarkets.
As the pulmonarias pull out of the As the pulmonarias pull out of the limelight, anchusas, another borage relation, step into it.
RELATIVE NEWCOMERS: Root cuttings are a good way to increase many borage relatives, including comfreys and all the longifolia forms of pulmonaria.