booster dose


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dose

 [dōs]
the quantity to be administered at one time, as a specified amount of medication or a given quantity of radiation.
absorbed dose that amount of energy from ionizing radiations absorbed per unit mass of matter, expressed in rads.
air dose the intensity of an x-ray or gamma-ray beam in air, expressed in roentgens.
booster dose an amount of immunogen (vaccine, toxoid, or other antigen preparation), usually smaller than the original amount, injected at an appropriate interval after primary immunization to sustain the immune response to that immunogen.
curative dose (CD) a dose that is sufficient to restore normal health. See also median curative dose.
divided dose fractionated dose.
effective dose (ED) that quantity of a drug that will produce the effects for which it is administered. See also median effective dose.
erythema dose that amount of radiation that, when applied to the skin, causes erythema (temporary reddening).
fatal dose lethal dose.
fractionated dose a fraction of the total dose prescribed, as of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, to be given at intervals, usually during a 24-hour period.
infective dose (ID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will cause infection in susceptible subjects. See also median infective dose and tissue culture infective dose.
lethal dose (LD) that quantity of an agent that will or may be sufficient to cause death. See also median lethal dose and minimum lethal dose.
loading dose a dose of medication, often larger than subsequent doses, administered for the purpose of establishing a therapeutic level of the medication.
maintenance dose the amount of a medication administered to maintain a desired level of the medication in the blood.
maximum tolerated dose tolerance dose.
maximum permissible dose the largest amount of ionizing radiation that one may safely receive within a specified period according to recommended limits in current radiation protection guides. The specific amounts vary with age and circumstance.
median curative dose (CD50) a dose that abolishes symptoms in 50 per cent of test subjects.
median effective dose (ED50) a dose that produces the desired effect in 50 per cent of a population.
median infective dose (ID50) that amount of pathogenic microorganisms that will produce demonstrable infection in 50 per cent of the test subjects.
median lethal dose (LD50) the quantity of an agent that will kill 50 per cent of the test subjects; in radiology, the amount of radiation that will kill, within a specified period, 50 per cent of individuals in a large group or population.
median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection in 50 per cent of cell cultures inoculated.
minimum lethal dose
1. the amount of toxin that will just kill an experimental animal.
2. the smallest quantity of diphtheria toxin that will kill a guinea pig of 250-gm weight in 4 to 5 days when injected subcutaneously.
reference dose an estimate of the daily exposure to a substance for humans that is assumed to be without appreciable risk; it is calculated using the no observed adverse effect level and is more conservative than the older margin of safety.
skin dose (SD)
1. the air dose of radiation at the skin surface, comprising the primary radiation plus backscatter.
2. the absorbed dose in the skin.
threshold dose the minimum dose of ionizing radiation, a chemical, or a drug that will produce a detectable degree of any given effect.
threshold erythema dose (TED) the single skin dose that will produce, in 80 per cent of those tested, a faint but definite erythema within 30 days, and in the other 20 per cent, no visible reaction.
tissue culture infective dose (TCID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection when inoculated on tissue cultures; used with a numeric qualifier.
tolerance dose the largest quantity of an agent that may be administered without harm. Called also maximum tolerated dose.

boost·er dose

a dose given at some time after an initial dose to enhance the effect, said usually of antigens for the production of antibodies.

booster dose

booster dose

a second or later vaccine dose given after the original (primary) dose to increase (boost) immunity.

boost·er dose

(būstĕr dōs)
Dose given at some time after an initial dose to enhance the effect.

booster dose

see booster dose.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a hypothetical population with the age distribution and transmission patterns of Alaska Natives, the most effective strategy with PRP-T vaccines again would have been vaccinating with a primary series and a booster dose at 12-15 months, which yielded an equilibrium incidence of 50.
Prior to administration of MassBiologics' Td, patients, parents or guardians should be informed by the health care provider of the benefits and risks of immunization with Td and of the importance of completing the primary immunization series or receiving recommended booster doses.
Parents should connect with their child's school nurse or other healthcare provider to make sure their teen receives the meningococcal meningitis booster dose.
We are happy to having been able to commence the continuation of the ChronVac-C[R] study with a booster dose.
The results indicate that a booster dose of Tdap does not overcome the advantage in protection from pertussis afforded to those who previously received four doses of the whole-cell vaccine," Dr.
CHICAGO -- Modeling suggests that routine administration of a booster dose of pertussis vaccine to adolescents would be highly cost effective, Dr.
All children in Rhondda Taff Ely who have received only one dose of the MCC vaccine will now be offered a second booster dose.
Finally, Tripep has filed an application with the Swedish Medical Products Agency to give the last three patients in the finalized study a fifth booster dose 6-12 months after the fourth dose.
Based on the information currently available, the meeting considered a booster dose of 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV13) among children under 5 years old who had received PCV7 or PCV10 is not required at this point in time.
Public health officials recommend vaccination for preteens and teens starting at age 11 or 12 years, with a booster dose by 18 years of age to help protect them during the years when they are at greatest risk of infection.
A booster dose is given to the child at the age of 18 months.
BioThrax is administered by intramuscular injection in five doses, with an annual booster dose recommended thereafter.