booster dose


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dose

 [dōs]
the quantity to be administered at one time, as a specified amount of medication or a given quantity of radiation.
absorbed dose that amount of energy from ionizing radiations absorbed per unit mass of matter, expressed in rads.
air dose the intensity of an x-ray or gamma-ray beam in air, expressed in roentgens.
booster dose an amount of immunogen (vaccine, toxoid, or other antigen preparation), usually smaller than the original amount, injected at an appropriate interval after primary immunization to sustain the immune response to that immunogen.
curative dose (CD) a dose that is sufficient to restore normal health. See also median curative dose.
divided dose fractionated dose.
effective dose (ED) that quantity of a drug that will produce the effects for which it is administered. See also median effective dose.
erythema dose that amount of radiation that, when applied to the skin, causes erythema (temporary reddening).
fatal dose lethal dose.
fractionated dose a fraction of the total dose prescribed, as of chemotherapy or radiation therapy, to be given at intervals, usually during a 24-hour period.
infective dose (ID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will cause infection in susceptible subjects. See also median infective dose and tissue culture infective dose.
lethal dose (LD) that quantity of an agent that will or may be sufficient to cause death. See also median lethal dose and minimum lethal dose.
loading dose a dose of medication, often larger than subsequent doses, administered for the purpose of establishing a therapeutic level of the medication.
maintenance dose the amount of a medication administered to maintain a desired level of the medication in the blood.
maximum tolerated dose tolerance dose.
maximum permissible dose the largest amount of ionizing radiation that one may safely receive within a specified period according to recommended limits in current radiation protection guides. The specific amounts vary with age and circumstance.
median curative dose (CD50) a dose that abolishes symptoms in 50 per cent of test subjects.
median effective dose (ED50) a dose that produces the desired effect in 50 per cent of a population.
median infective dose (ID50) that amount of pathogenic microorganisms that will produce demonstrable infection in 50 per cent of the test subjects.
median lethal dose (LD50) the quantity of an agent that will kill 50 per cent of the test subjects; in radiology, the amount of radiation that will kill, within a specified period, 50 per cent of individuals in a large group or population.
median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection in 50 per cent of cell cultures inoculated.
minimum lethal dose
1. the amount of toxin that will just kill an experimental animal.
2. the smallest quantity of diphtheria toxin that will kill a guinea pig of 250-gm weight in 4 to 5 days when injected subcutaneously.
reference dose an estimate of the daily exposure to a substance for humans that is assumed to be without appreciable risk; it is calculated using the no observed adverse effect level and is more conservative than the older margin of safety.
skin dose (SD)
1. the air dose of radiation at the skin surface, comprising the primary radiation plus backscatter.
2. the absorbed dose in the skin.
threshold dose the minimum dose of ionizing radiation, a chemical, or a drug that will produce a detectable degree of any given effect.
threshold erythema dose (TED) the single skin dose that will produce, in 80 per cent of those tested, a faint but definite erythema within 30 days, and in the other 20 per cent, no visible reaction.
tissue culture infective dose (TCID) that amount of a pathogenic agent that will produce infection when inoculated on tissue cultures; used with a numeric qualifier.
tolerance dose the largest quantity of an agent that may be administered without harm. Called also maximum tolerated dose.

boost·er dose

a dose given at some time after an initial dose to enhance the effect, said usually of antigens for the production of antibodies.

booster dose

booster dose

a second or later vaccine dose given after the original (primary) dose to increase (boost) immunity.

boost·er dose

(būstĕr dōs)
Dose given at some time after an initial dose to enhance the effect.

booster dose

see booster dose.
References in periodicals archive ?
coli inactivated vaccine, the geometric mean of ELISA was increased from 21120 at 1 week after vaccination to27784 at 3 week then decreased to 19907 at 1 week after booster dose then increased to 40179 at 3 week after booster while the titer after challenge decreased to 15171 at 1st week and increased to 37068 at 2nd week.
PPRV primed goats when received the booster dose of the respective vaccine showed higher antibody response than the primed goats after 30 days post boosting (Figure 3).
However, the sizable minority of the panel who opposed the addition of the booster dose for 16-year-olds cited cost and lack of cost-effectiveness.
The problem is being caused by a failure by parents to get their children fully protected with the follow up booster doses given at four months and 13 months.
But one child in every six in Wales is missing a final booster dose at 13 months which is essential in order to fully protect children against pneumococcal disease.
According to Losordo, administering a heavy dose of adult stem cells, as he did in this experiment, is tantamount to "giving a booster dose of the natural mechanism for tissue repair.
The first dose usually is given to children who are about 18 to 24 months old and is followed by a preschool booster dose.
Earlier this year, Bro Taf Health Authority offered a booster dose of meningitis C vaccine to all children in the Rhondda Taff Ely area of south Wales.
Earlier this year Bro Taf Health Authority offered a booster dose of meningitis C vaccine to all children in the Rhondda Taff Ely area, and follow up tests show that the children are very well protected.
Although the IOM is no longer confident in its ability to diagnose the ills of long-term care and prescribe a booster dose of regulation, the new report continues to advocate "reform" in the field.
A booster dose is given after one year of age and at least 6 months after the third dose of vaccine.