boomer


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boomer

Drug slang
A regional term for psilocybin/psilocin.
 
Vox populi
Baby boomer, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both millennials and boomers said they were happy to save, and the vast majority equated doing so with financial security.
Research has shown that [older] customers' final decisions are not the direct product of the reasoning process; in fact, emotions drive Boomer and older customers in their purchase decisions.
With baby boomers numbering at 76 million and possessing tremendous buying power, retailers cannot afford to neglect them on the store brand side.
But the next wave of boomers to retire are more Democratic than the ones to follow.
The baby boomers made their first significant investments in the early 1980s.
Because more than four out of five Boomers will do whatever it takes to stay in their current residence, aging in place will spur numerous opportunities from caregiving products and services to home renovations for more senior accessibility.
You can imagine their laughter when they discovered what Boomer was doing with the duck.
Research is showing that only one-third of boomers have adequately planned for their golden years.
Like many of his industry colleagues, Carne doesn't try to target the boomer demographic, but depends on a broad offer - which includes freshly made sandwiches on store-baked bread, fresh cookies, soft-serve ice cream and a large coffee selection - to cast a wide net, including older customers.
Boomer mothers worked, much against the pundits' received wisdom, and boomer dads shared parenting with boomer moms to an unprecedented extent.
The early baby boomers (born 1946-1955) are actually much better oft, financially speaking, than are late boomers (1956-1964), says Kessler.
As a group, boomers are more affluent, more highly educated and have higher expectations than previous generations.