bonus

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bonus

A general term for any benefit of a job or a lump-sum payment given to an employee, often at year’s end—e.g., “Christmas bonus”—which is a tangible expression of the employer’s gratitude for the employee’s performance.

bonus

Any benefit of a job or a lump-sum of cash given to an employee, which is a tangible expression of the employer's gratitude for the employee's performance. See Immune bonus, Marriage bonus, Signing bonus.
References in periodicals archive ?
The IRS recognized that the employer is obligated under the bonus plan to pay the group of employees the minimum amount of the bonuses determined by the end of the year.
htm) 2014 Glocap Hedge Fund Compensation report that said even junior professionals working for a hedge fund will see a third consecutive yearly rise in pay and bonuses.
A bonus allocable to an employee who is no longer employed on the date on which bonuses are paid is reallocated to other eligible employees.
Civil servants should be setting an example to the politicians and AMs and not getting paid bonuses for doing a job they're already paid to do.
Some commentators are advising that it would be wise for employers to pay discretionary bonuses in full during ordinary maternity leave and also during additional maternity leave.
Teachers in San Francisco, Piedmont and San Jose, among other districts, turned down the bonuses because they felt it pitted teacher-against-teacher, and forced them to teach to the multiple-choice test instead of to the individual student.
About 27% of variable-annuity sales this year are of products that offer bonuses, according to an estimate by Nancy Kenneally, a consultant in the New York office of Tilling-hast-Towers Perrin.
CIOs were asked, "At which of the following levels does your company offer signing bonuses when recruiting IT professionals, if at all?
However, companies must be careful not to rely only on lump-sum bonuses for compensating their general work force.
Bonuses may take the form of cash or stock and many companies use both forms of bonus plans.
While bonuses have decreased as a percentage of salary in many job categories, the overall trend in both salaries and total cash compensation (salary and bonus) is still distinctly positive across all job families, as shown in the figure on page 50.
In his recent "State of the Economy" speech, President Bush criticized lavish salaries and bonuses for corporate executives and issued a warning for corporate boards to "step up to their responsibilities" and tie compensation packages to performance.