bone loss


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Related to bone loss: osteopenia

bone loss

bone loss

A popular term for any reduction of bone mass, often used synonymously with osteoporosis

loss

(los)
1. The basis of claim on the part of a party to a lawsuit or an insurance carrier. In litigation, loss may be expressed in monetary terms.
2. Destruction, degeneration, or the wasting of cells, tissues, organs, or capabilities.

bone loss

Osteoporosis.

central vision loss

Loss of the ability to see things directly in front of the eye, often occurring in patients with macular degeneration. The macula of the retina contains the greatest concentration of cone photoreceptors in the eye and is the location on the retina where vision is sharpest and colors are perceived with greatest clarity. When diseases like macular degeneration disturb the integrity of the macula, central vision loss occurs. A sudden loss of central vision is an ophthalmological emergency, requiring referral to a retinal specialist as soon as possible.

conductive hearing loss

Hearing loss due to any condition that prevents sound waves from being transmitted to the auditory receptors. It may result from wax obstructing the external auditory meatus, inflammation of the middle ear, ankylosis of the ear bones, or fixation of the footplate of the stirrup.
Synonym: conduction deafness See: otosclerosis; Rinne test; Weber test

loss of consciousness

Syncope.

functional visual loss

A reduction in vision with no identifiable lesion of the visual pathways. It may be caused by an occult disease of the eye or of the optical centers in the brain. It may also occur in certain psychiatric disorders.

gravity-induced loss of consciousness

Abbreviation: GLOC
The loss of consciousness due to positive gravity (G) forces. Certain aviation maneuvers produce increased downward force (that is, positive G) that is measured as a multiple of the gravitational constant. When these forces are of sufficient intensity, blood flow to the brain is diminished, which, if continued, leads to unconsciousness.

hearing loss

A decreased ability to perceive sounds as compared with what the individual or examiner would regard as normal. In the U.S., about 1 million school-age children and 25 million adults have some degree of hearing loss.
See: audiogram; audiometry

insensible fluid loss

Insensible loss.

insensible loss

A loss of body fluid that is not easily measured, e.g., the moisture released in exhalation and perspiration. The amount of fluid typically lost is about 200 mL a day. Insensible fluid losses increase in any disease or condition that increases diffusion of liquid from the skin or the lungs, e.g., in burns, climatic changes, fever, or heavy exercise.
Synonym: insensible fluid loss

noise-induced hearing loss

Hearing loss from exposure to very loud sounds (over 85 dB). The loss is usually most profound at a frequency of 4000 Hz. Common causes include working with noisy machinery, listening to loud music, or discharging rifles, guns, or explosives. Wearing ear plugs or earmuffs may be preventive.

peripheral vision loss

Tunnel vision (1).

pregnancy loss

Miscarriage or stillbirth.

recurrent pregnancy loss

Abbreviation: RPL
Three or more consecutive miscarriages that occur before the 20th week of gestation.

sensible loss

A measurable loss of body fluid, e.g., blood, diarrhea, urine, vomit. If sensible losses consistently exceed fluid intake, dehydration may result.

sensorineural hearing loss

Hearing loss from permanent or temporary damage to the sensory cells or nerve fibers of the inner ear.

sudden hearing loss

Hearing loss that occurs in 72 hr or less. It may be temporary or permanent. Some of the most common causes include cerumen impaction, medication toxicities, acute infections, ear trauma, Ménière's disease, and ischemia.

vitamin loss

Loss of vitamin content in food products from oxidation or heating. Methods of preserving foods such as pickling, salting, curing, fermenting, and canning enhance vitamin loss. Vitamin C is esp. labile; up to 85% is lost in commercial canning and pasteurization. Vitamin B1 in wheat is lost through milling because the vitamin B1 wheat embryo is removed.

weight loss

A measurable decline in body weight (BW) either intentionally or from malnutrition or illness. It is considered mild when 5% of BW is lost, moderate when 5-10% of BW is lost, and high when more than 10% of BW is lost.

Patient care

Intentional weight loss achieved through dieting and/or exercise has significant health benefits for the overweight or obese. It reduces the risk of many common illnesses, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Unintentional weight loss, esp. of more than 10% of BW may be a marker of serious disease, such as AIDS, cancer, depression, hyperthyroidism, parasitosis, peptic ulceration, or food insecurity (starvation due to an inadequate food supply).

bone loss

(bōn laws)
In dentistry, resorption of alveolar bone due to disease, trauma, or irritants.
See also: bone resorption

Patient discussion about bone loss

Q. is bone loss related to Arthritis?

A. It depends on the kind of arthritis. In some arthritic diseases there's local bone loss, and generalized bone loss (osteoporosis) may result from steroids used to treat arthritic diseases.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/osteoporosis.html

Q. is there is any relation between not enough acid and arthritis?is bone loss is another factor in this decease?

A. Do you refer to less of acid secretion in the stomach (hypochlorhydia)? If so, then sjogren syndrome is a disease that cause both lack of acid in the stomach (due to chronic inflammation of the stomach, called atrophic gastritis) and arthritis (sometimes osteoarthritis).

Bone loss (osteoporosis) is actually associated with LOWER risk for osteoarthritis, although it has its own detrimental effects, so one should treat osteoporosis (and prevent osteoarthritis in other ways).

Q. Is osteoporosis preventable? My mother had osteoporosis and I already have osteopenia which may lead to it. How can I prevent it??

A. Prevention of osteoporosis, in it's strict sense, is done mainly during childhood through early adulthood (third decade) - the years during which the peak bone density is determined. At older age, treatment of osteoporosis, apart from medications, include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, physical activity and avoiding smoking and excess alcohol consumption.

There are also medications to treat osteoporosis, mainly from the bisphosphanate class. However, remember to consult your doctor before you make any change in your diet or start exercise program.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/osteoporosis.html

More discussions about bone loss
References in periodicals archive ?
In discussing their findings, the investigators wrote that the "results from the hand bone density studies also suggest that prednisolone is equivalent to [anti-tumor necrosis factor] treatment in reducing the rate of hand bone loss.
We have found that we can, on average, prevent bone loss in an important region of the hip with this intervention," said Dr.
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To look specifically at the impact on bone loss, the researchers crossed mice bred to overexpress tumor necrosis factor alpha throughout the body with mice that overexpressed GILZ in just their mesenchymal stem cells.
This was markedly distinct from the effect seen with DTrp, which showed a highly positive correlation between clinical score and bone loss (ie reduced bone loss associated with better anti-arthritic effect).
The bone loss in the surgical patients," Yu said, "occurred despite the fact that they were not losing any more weight in the second year after surgery and had stable blood levels of calcium and vitamin D.
Osteoporosis can trigger bone loss for many years without symptoms until a fracture occurs.
This trial at Florida State University in Tallahassee found that KoACT may have the potential to reverse bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women.
In the SABRE study [17] (anastrozole with risedronate in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer), results have indicated that risedronate reduced bone marker levels and prevented bone loss in osteopaenic patients receiving anastrozole.
Thousand Oaks, CA) will summarize data from the submitted Biologic License Applications (BLAs) for denosumab for the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and the prevention and treatment of bone loss in breast and prostate cancer patients undergoing hormone ablation at a meeting with the United States Food and Drug Administration's Advisory Committee for Reproductive Health Drugs (ACRHD).
Bone loss in women increases significantly during the late perimenopausal period and may reach more than 2% annually in the early postmenopausal period, particularly in the more hormonally sensitive lumbar spine (trabecular bone).
Two dietary supplements widely used by arthritis sufferers may help slow the bone loss associated with the joint disease, a "basic sciences" study indicates.