bone densitometry

(redirected from bone density scan)

bone densitometry

any of several methods of determining bone mass by measuring radiation absorption by the skeleton. Common techniques include single-photon absorptiometry (SPA) of the forearm and heel, dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the spine and hip, quantitative computed tomography (QCT) of the spine and forearm, radiographic absorptiometry (RA) of the hand, and quantitative ultrasound (QU).

bone densitometry

The measurement of bone mass or density. The current methods—single-photon absorptiometry, dual-energy photon absorptiometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry—are based on tissue absorption of photons derived from either a radionuclide or an X-ray tube; the latter are more accurate with shorter scan time. Other techniques are based on ultrasonography.

bone densitometry

The measurement of bone mass or density; the current methods—single-photon absorptiometry, dual-energy photon absorptiometry, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, are based on tissue absorption of photons derived from either a radionuclide or an X-ray tube; the latter are more accurate with shorter scan time. See Osteoporosis.

bone min·er·al den·si·ty

(BMD) (bōn min'ĕr-al den'si-tē)
Measurement of the amount of calcium in bone. Most methods for measuring BMD (also called bone densitometry) are fast, noninvasive, painless, and available on an outpatient basis. Bone densitometry can also be used to estimate a patient's risk of fracture. BMD methods involve taking dual energy x-rays (DEXA) or CT scans of bones in the spinal column, wrist, arm, or leg. These methods compare the numeric density of the bone (calculated from the image) with empiric (historical) databases of bone density to determine whether a patient has osteoporosis, and to what degree.
Synonym(s): bone densitometry.

bone densitometry (bōnˑ den·si·tˑ·me·trē),

n test that determines bone density according to the radiation absorption rate of the skeletal structure being tested.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoporosis can be diagnosed using X-ray and can be confirmed by bone density scan.
This is because a drop in oestrogen for a long time can cause a loss in bone mass, so have a bone density scan, especially with a family history of osteoporosis.
Q As my mother had brittle bones, I asked my GP if I could have a bone density scan and I'm still reeling from the news that I have severe osteoporosis in my spine and pelvis.
He advised women above the age of 50 to get a bone density scan, a painless procedure that takes around 15 minutes.
I personally have been told that it will take eight months to get a bone density scan because there is only one operational scanner for the whole of Gwent and south-east Powys.
These findings provide a basis for aging individuals to have their blood tested for leptin and request their body fat percentage be measured when they get their bone density scan.
But if you're over 50 and have had an eating disorder, early menopause before 45) or have a family history of osteoporosis, see your GP about bone density scan.
Prior to taking it, my bone density scan showed the beginning of osteoporosis.
Gill Gough discusses her bone density scan with Isobel Pugh and (inset) Prof Stuart Palmer who led the team which invented the machine more than 20 years ago.
Along with the presentation to the parent community of ASD, a free bone density scan was made available to parents to test for the risk for Osteoporosis.
Professor Cyrus Cooper, director of the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Resource Centre based at the University of Southampton, said: "Osteoporosis is usually diagnosed using a DXA bone density scan whose images allow the strength of bone to be assessed.