bomb

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bomb

Computers
An abnormal termination of a program being executed, which requires that the computer be rebooted.
 
Drug slang
A regional street term for a large quantity of various drugs of abuse—e.g., crack, heroin, or a large marijuana cigarette.
 
Military noun
A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs—e.g., being moved, or on a timer.

verb To attack an opponent with (aerial) bombs.
 
Popular psychology
See Time bomb.

Radiation oncology
A container formerly used to store radioactive materials (e.g., radium) for future use in radiotherapy.

Vox populi
The significance of the word bomb may depend on whether the speaker uses the indefinite article—e.g., “a bomb”, which means that the subject matter is awful— or the definite article—e.g., “the bomb”, which means that the subject matter is cool, fashionable or exciting.

bomb

Military medicine A device designed to cause physical damage to a specified area, by exploding on impact or when a particular event occurs–eg, being moved. See B-61, Dirty bomb, Genetic bomb Popular psychology See Time bomb.

bomb

A radioactive source held in a container for the purpose of RADIOTHERAPY.
References in periodicals archive ?
18, 2007) (describing Israel Military Industries's (IMI) cluster bomblet with self-destruct fuse).
The bomblets can resemble a large flashlight battery or a tennis ball.
France seems to see little future for bomblet rounds at all.
A spokesman said: "We can confirm that Craig Appleby, a battle area clearance team leader, was conducting cluster munitions clearance operations on a site in southern Lebanon, when a bomblet exploded and resulted in Craig sustaining fatal injuries.
On May 1, a bomblet from a cluster bomb that Gomi was bringing home as a souvenir from Iraq exploded at the airport, killing Ali al-Sarhan and injuring the five.
Each Mat-120 bomblet can penetrate up to 150 mm of steel while scattering effective fragments over a 15-metre radius.
Major military powers however, including China, Russia, the United States and Israel, which are thought to account for the huge bulk of the estimated one billion bomblet global stockpile, have rejected the treaty so far.
The president of Mainichi Shimbun, a major Japanese newspaper, apologized in person to Jordanian King Abdullah II on Thursday over last week's fatal explosion at Amman airport of a cluster bomblet in a Mainichi photographer's luggage.
An "official American document" of July 1997 is cited as saying that an unexploded bomblet from the CBU-87 can "be detonated or exploded by the presence, proximity or contact of a person.
Each bomblet has a shaped charge with a fragmentation sleeve giving both anti-armour and anti-personnel effect.
In a news conference in Amman on Monday, Yoshiaki Ito, deputy managing editor of the Mainichi Shimbun, said the metal device that exploded during a security check appears to have been a cluster bomblet Gomi picked up while he was traveling in Iraq.