bombard


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bom·bard

(bom-bard'),
To expose a substance to particulate or electromagnetic radiations for the purpose of making it radioactive.
[Mediev. L. bombarda, artillery assault, fr. bombus, a booming sound]

bombard

[bombärd′]
to shower a drug or tissue sample with radioactive particles from a nuclear isotope source.

bombard

Military
To attack an enemy’s “soft targets”—undefended objects, houses, public buildings—with concentrated artillery with the intent of demoralising civilians and having them pressure their leaders into surrender. Initially defined as use of land-based heavy guns, bombardment has evolved into an equivalent of aerial bombing with the advent of military aviation.
 
Radiation physics
To expose a material to a beam of ionising radiation or highly charged particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bombard was kept in the Summer Street Jail in Worcester until he was convicted on Oct.
Bombard has run out of adjectives to describe Piekarczyk's on-ice/off-ice work ethic and leadership that have helped him become such a well-rounded player.
Bombard and Dubois (2 for 3) followed with singles before Cam O'Toole sent a fly ball into the gap in right-center that scored Fletcher and Bombard to make it 2-0.
He was the husband for 58 years to the late Doris Rose (Garceau) Bombard, who died in 2009.
Some of the ions ultimately bombard Earth, Schwadron and his colleagues calculate.
He is survived by his children, Kathleen Caves and her husband Douglas of Fitchburg, Nancy Bombard and her partner John Prendiville of Worcester and Susan Bombard of Berlin.
As the ultraviolet light continues to bombard the pillars, it both hinders and fosters star birth.
We felt that rules are rules, and you obey the rules," said ninth-year Auburn coach Glen Bombard.