bolus

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bolus

 [bo´lus]
1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to be swallowed, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g., an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously or swallowed.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.
alimentary bolus the mass of food, made ready by mastication, that enters the esophagus at one swallow.

bo·lus (bol),

(bō'lŭs),
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use, such as a bolus dose of a drug injected intravenously.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed, such as a bolus of barium for radiographic studies.
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed in the radiation beam, over the surface of the irradiated region, to increase the absorbed dose in the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

/bo·lus/ (bo´lus)
1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to swallow, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g., an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.

bolus

[bō′ləs]
Etymology: Gk, bolos, lump
1 also called alimentary bolus, a round mass, specifically a mass of solids and semisolids that have been chewed (masticated) and mixed with saliva during the oral preparation of swallow prior to being digested.
2 a large round preparation of medicinal material for oral ingestion, usually soft and not prepackaged.
3 a dose of a medication or a contrast material, radioactive isotope, or other pharmaceutic preparation injected all at once intravenously.
4 (in radiotherapy) material used to fill in irregular body surfaces to improve dose distribution for hyperthermia or to increase the dose to the skin when high-energy photon beams are used.
5 a clumping in the stomach of ingested foreign material, often the result of habitual behavior.

bolus

(1) Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
(2) Any mass or globule—e.g., masticated food—in transit through a tube.

Endocrinology
An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose (sugar) such as the rise that occurs after eating.

Therapeutics
A large IV dose of a drug given all at once at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level. In treating malignancy, prolonged IV infusions may be more effective than intermittent bolus injections.
 
Vox populi
A popular term for a hyperinfusion of information—e.g., “crash” review courses before boards exams.

bolus

1. Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
2. Any mass or blob–eg, masticated food, in transit through a tube Endocrinology An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose–sugar such as the rise that occurs after eating Therapeutics A large IV dose of a drug given “all at once” at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level.

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., bolus dose of an intravenously injected drug) generally followed by smaller doses.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed (e.g., a bolus of barium for x-ray studies).
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed next to the irradiated region to increase the dose of secondary radiation to the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

1. A chewed-up quantity of food in a state ready to be swallowed.
2. The dose of a drug injected as rapidly a possible into a vein so as to be diluted as little as possible.

bolus

a soft mass of chewed food, suitable for swallowing, shaped by the tongue in the BUCCAL cavity

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., dose of an intravenous drug).
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus (bō´ləs),

n a mass of food ready to be swallowed or a mass passing through the intestines.

bolus

1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to be swallowed, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract. In previous times most medication for horses was given by bolus. Called also ball.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g. an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.

alimentary bolus
the mass of food, made ready by mastication, that enters the esophagus at one swallow.
intraruminal identification bolus
contain passive radiofrequency responders for individual animal identification. Used in sheep and cattle.
physic bolus
see physic (2).
purging bolus
an oldtime treatment for equine colic. Usually contained aloes or istin.
References in periodicals archive ?
For more information regarding QuikCal Calcium Boluses or to find the nearest authorized Centaur distributor location, please contact Centaur Animal Health at 800-236-6180 or via email - sales@centauranimalhealth.
The total numbers of chews were in the order of TMR2>TMR1>control, which were proportionate to the numbers of boluses (p<0.
The number of boluses per minute was in the order of TMR2 (1.
The four additional boluses (boluses 6-9) contained 378 individuals distributed among five orders of insects and three spiders; family level identifications were not attempted.
One group was dosed orally with two soluble glass sintered boluses (100 g for a bolus) containing 13.
The poster, entitled "Multilamellar Freeze-Dried Liposomes Demonstrate Safety with Sustained Doses of PGE-1--Well-tolerated up to 120 micrograms/hr," describes the Phase I clinical trial in which five healthy volunteers were given intravenous boluses of Liprostin(TM) at 20 micrograms to 120 micrograms without hemodynamic compromise.
Now he has begun giving iodine boluses to his 23-head suckler herd - and has seen instant results.
Programming the pump to adjust basal insulin delivery rates and boluses throughout the day allows for more precise glycemic control, achievement of target HbA1c levels, and prevention of long-term complications," Sand said.