sweet gale

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sweet gale

n.
A deciduous shrub (Myrica gale) of northern Eurasian and North American wetlands, having clusters of small unisexual flowers and aromatic resinous leaves used medicinally and in brewing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name Wirral comes from the Ancient English, 'wir' meaning Bog Myrtle and 'heal' meaning corner (as in peninsular).
Bog Myrtle is a small flowering shrub that can grow up to two meters tall.
The small leaf shrub - also called bog myrtle - grows wild across the country and is a natural insecticide.
Plants with potential ranged from poppies, thyme, linola seed an St John's wort to bog myrtle and trees which can grow up to 20ft a year for use in wood-burning power stations.
Local garden herbs were used for flavouring such as basil and marjoram, sage or bog myrtle.
A big fan of the great outdoors, James has been shooting since he was young, cultivates a vegetable garden and forages for everything from wild mushrooms to sorrel, yarrow and bog myrtle to flavour his dishes.
Below the buildings is a musical stave, overlaid with a flowing, repeating design of the leaf of the bog myrtle, the plant that in Anglo-Saxon times was widespread across the peninsula and gave Wirral its name.
Scientists have discovered that Sweet Gale, or Bog Myrtle as it is commonly known in Scotland, has an amazing range of previously unknown properties which makes it ideal for use in products designed for people with skin problems.
James has been shooting since he was knee high to a grasshopper, cultivates a veggie garden and forages for all manner of goodies, from wild mushrooms, sorrel, yarrow and wild hazelnuts to bog myrtle, to flavour his dishes.
5 Place two sprigs of bog myrtle behind your ears - the midges avoid you if you look ridiculous.
There are also areas of juniper woodland, dry heath, and bog myrtle mire - the latter a particularly rare habitat type in the North East which is found on the site in particular abundance.