body language


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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

bod·y lan·guage

1. the expression of thoughts and feelings by means of nonverbal bodily movements, for example, gestures, or via the symptoms of hysterical conversion;
2. communication by means of bodily signs.

body language

n.
The gestures, postures, and facial expressions by which a person manifests various physical, mental, or emotional states and communicates nonverbally with others.

body language

Etymology: AS, bodig + L, lingua, tongue
a set of nonverbal signals, including body movements, postures, gestures, spatial positions, facial expressions, and body adornment, that give expression to various physical, mental, and emotional states. See also kinesics.
An informal, often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs

body language

Psychology An informal often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs. See Kinesics.

bod·y lan·guage

(bod'ē lang'gwăj)
A form of communication using body movements or gestures instead of or in addition to speech or other forms of communication.

body language

The communication of information, usually of a personal nature, without the medium of speech, writing or other agreed codes. Body language involves a range of subtle or obvious physical attitudes, expressions, gestures and relative positions. It can, and often does, eloquently reflect current states of mind and attitudes towards others, whether positive or negative. Body language is often at variance with explicit verbal statement and in such cases is often the more reliable indicator.

body language

non-verbal communication that expresses a person's current physical, emotional and mental state. It includes body movements, postures, gestures, facial expressions, spatial positions, attire and other bodily adornments.

body language

the expression of feelings by means of postures or gestures. Flamboyant body language is characteristic of primates but most animal species use gestures to demonstrate their attitudes to other animals and to the environment generally.
References in periodicals archive ?
And it's become clear to me, for one, that better understanding body language can benefit every area of your life: if this is a subject that truly comprises nearly 60 per cent of our communication, then surely it's also responsible for 60 per cent of what people actually think of us.
He said body language was also important in the context of cultural peculiarities.
Pease says understanding body language can help you get what you want from your life.
I completely failed to read the body language in the room.
Regardless of the leadership role we assume in life (whether as a spouse, parent, law enforcement professional, or friend and colleague), it is imperative that we read and recognize the nonverbal body language of those with whom we interact.
Formulating those answers usually gets in the way of listening, observing body language and understanding what someone else is saying.
Once you have relaxed, you can master simple body language techniques.
While Don't Murder Your Mystery is written especially for mystery, suspense, and crime fiction writers, the tips, tricks and techniques from bewaring cliches or avoiding clumsy and confusing body language descriptions to making one's dialogue snappy, sharpening self-editing skills and much more will prove invaluable to fiction writers of all genres.
Of course, the body language provides the controlling metaphor for preaching on this occasion.
If the QB continues to drop back after three steps, the corner should, while back-peddling, shift his eyes immediately to the receiver, and proceed to the next level of man coverage--which is reading the route and the body language of the receiver.
I captured this moment of gentle expression and body language as she looked away from her work to listen to a coworker.