body burden


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Related to body burden: Hazardous chemical

burden

 [ber´den]
body burden chemicals stored in the body that may be detected by analysis.

bod·y bur·den

(bod'ē bĕr'den),
Activity of a radiopharmaceutical retained by the body at a specified time following administration.

body burden

1 the state of activity of a radioactive chemical in the body at a specified time after administration.
2 chemicals stored in the body that may be detected by analysis.
The total amount of a particular agent or chemical in the body. For some chemicals, the body burden is high, because the agent is stored in fat or bone or is eliminated very slowly

body burden

Therapeutics A popular term for the total amount of a particular agent or chemical in the body; for some chemicals, the BB is high, because the agent is stored in fat or bone or is eliminated very slowly

bod·y bur·den

(bod'ē bŭr'dĕn)
The amount of a harmful substance that is permanently present in a person's body.

bod·y bur·den

(bod'ē bŭr'dĕn)
The amount of a harmful substance that is permanently present in a person's body.
References in periodicals archive ?
With our read-across method (Level 2), the combined HI was more strongly influenced by BDE-100 (assumed to be as potent as BDE-99, with a critical body burden of 9,000 ng/kgbw) than by BDE-154 and -183 (assigned the reference value of BDE-153, 62,000 ng/kg), and it was least influenced by the higher-brominated congeners that were assigned the reference value of BDE-209 (425,000 ng/kg) (Figure 1).
This difference, however, was a product of the influence of histological section size rather than an inherently higher body burden.
Biomonitoring has limitations, since it can be difficult to identify the primary source of exposures and it is rarely possible to predict health outcomes based on chemical body burdens.
In general, the urinary cadmium level reflects the body burden over long-term exposure before the development of kidney damage, and blood cadmium is considered an indicator of recent exposure (69).
These data would be used, along with PCB congener data, if any significant changes in contaminant body burden of the MCRL workers aroused suspicion that contaminant loads were confounded by aspects of lifestyle.
These public health achievements show that reductions in the production, use and disposal of toxic chemicals, along with the destruction of toxic chemical stockpiles and reservoirs, can all decrease the body burden of noxious materials in our children and in us.
Blood lead represents only 1-5% of the total body burden of lead (4,17).
Risk perceived to be posed by body burdens of lead is endogenous because parents are aware that they can influence it by reducing exposures, A, and by the use of medical treatment, M:
The Flint water poisoning is a more acute event that suddenly changes everything for a large number of unsuspecting people --infants, children, and adults of all ages --adding further to their underlying body burden of lead and other toxic metals already accumulated over their lifetimes.
Sampling occurred in winter to minimize the influence of gametogenesis and spawning on contaminant body burden (Jovanovich & Marion 1987, Ellis et al.
Tenders are invited for Conduct a biomonitoring program to assess body burden of legacy contaminants and chemicals of emerging concern in susceptible Great Lakes populations in areas
9) We know from body burden studies that the average American has at least one form of parabens stored in their body.