blunt

(redirected from bluntness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

blunt

(blunt) having a thick or dull edge or point; not sharp.

blunt

Forensics
Referring to an object—in particular one used to strike blows against a person—which causes flatter wounds with broader regional tissue damage than that caused by a sharp object.
 
Medspeak
See Blunt dissection.
 
Vox populi
Curt, frank, coarse, rude, brusque, candid.

blunt

(blŭnt)
1. Of surgical instruments, having a smooth or rounded end.
2. Having no sharp angles, edges, or points.
References in periodicals archive ?
With his bluntness and his phrase-turning acumen, presidential press conferences would become the ultimate must-see reality TV series.
The bluntness with which they hold one another accountable is astounding--in many ways it transcends the honesty and accountability to which many "older" adults aspire.
And Dean has accomplished all this by taking a plain stance against a popular war and criticizing the Bush administration as often as possible, with an appealing bluntness few professional politicians are capable of pulling off.
Such bluntness off the bench may explain why the former circuit chief judge and his circuit have not been given the respect of peers and jurists nationwide when compared to accolades for predecessors like Judges John Minor Wisdom and Elbert Tuttle in the old Fifth Circuit.
Written with van der Veer's usual bluntness and verve, it is a "must read.
Even many people who believe deeply in nonviolence might be taken aback by the bluntness of such a statement.
I n this sense, being a Texan like Stan and a being New Yorker like myself are two strangely similar modes of being-in-the-world: both Texas and New York harbor distinctive, strong American regional cultures that thrive on argument, bluntness, and putting one's two cents in.
165 in Queens, said it with typical New York bluntness.
Readers may find the bluntness of this storytelling overwhelming, as the details are often disturbing.
Such bluntness rare in the Arab world, illustrates the uncomfortable fact that the region's largest country, in common with other players, has all but run out of ideas as it faces up to the bloodshed of the continuing Palestinian-Israeli conflict and the resulting anger of millions of ordinary Egyptians).
He often spoke with an almost rude bluntness that must have unsettled his hearers; at the same time, he could, especially in his letters from exile, express a warmth that clearly sprang from loving concern for them.