blue-green algae


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Related to blue-green algae: spirulina, cyanobacteria

algae

 [al´je]
a group of plants living in the water, including all seaweeds, and ranging in size from microscopic cells to fronds hundreds of feet long.
blue-green algae former name for members of the group now called Cyanobacteria.

blue-green al·gae

former name for the blue-green bacteria, now classified as Cyanobacteria.

blue-green algae

misnomer formerly applied to the group now called the cyanobacteria.

blue-green algae

the former name for CYANOBACTERIA.

blue-green algae

see algal poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an outbreak of blue-green algae which is [harmful] to people and pets.
Recently, Houston had issues with blue-green algae in Lake Livingston and the Trinity River, which caused elevated levels of naturally-occurring chemicals that were not toxic or unsafe for drinking - but prompted a foul odor.
For current information visit GMW's blue-green algae webpage or call the blue-green algae hotline on 03 5826 3785.
Some kinds of blue-green algae produce natural toxins or poisons.
The forest of blue-green algae is choking coastal waters around the city, surrounding beaches and lying in thick layers along Olympic sailing routes.
The Quebec government's plan for tackling the blue-green algae problem in the province's lakes and rivers got barely a passing grade from lake and wastewater experts.
Albans Bay Watershed Association, says exorbitant amounts of money are being spent each year in weed removal and on problems associated with blue-green algae outbreaks.
Now Kate Birrell fears that children may be at risk from deadly toxins in the blue-green algae around the River Tay.
Veridium noted that the bioreactor is based on a strain of blue-green algae discovered in a hot stream at Yellowstone National Park that utilizes CO2 and water to grow new algae, giving off pure oxygen and water vapor in the process.
They maintain that the discovery of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, may be the source of the genetic material also used for that process in present-day plants such as trees and cotton.
Certain types of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, produce off-flavor compounds that can give catfish a muddy or earthy taste, which keeps them from being marketable.
Theorists projected that if this soil arrives at the right time in summer, the resulting iron enrichment of receiving waters should fertilize the growth of blue-green algae known as Trichodesmium.