blowfly


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Calliphora

(kă-lif'ō-ră),
A genus of blowflies (family Calliphoridae, order Diptera), the bluebottle flies, the larvae of which feed on dead flesh. Calliphora vomitoria and Calliphora vicina are common species in the U.S.
[G. kalli, beauty, + phoros, bearing]

blowfly

(blō′flī′)
n.
Any of various flies of the family Calliphoridae that have a metallic blue, green, or black body and deposit their eggs in carcasses or carrion or in open sores and wounds.

blowfly

A fly of the family Calliphoridae that deposits its eggs in wounds or open sores. A few days later the area is infected with maggots, but these remove dead tissue and do little harm.

blowfly

a member of the family Calliphoridae of insects.

blowfly strike
invasion of skin or exposed mucosae by blowfly larvae. See also cutaneous myiasis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Simon Worlock, for Caiach, said: "A blowfly strike is down to the common bluebottle.
Shearing before the main risk period where possible, dagging around the back end at other times - especially if there is faecal staining and adhesion - careful management of wounds to avoid infection and foot trimming to help control footrot/ovine digital dermatitis which can also attract the blowfly.
Every other day, each spider was fed with one blowfly (Lucilia spp.
Depending on the nature of the information, in some cases it might not be but, for motion sensitive neurons in the blowfly visual system, we show that timing is obviously important, especially in the context of natural visual stimulation.
This is a story about five of them: Hami the bedbug, Spritzer the dust mite, Darren the blowfly, and Nick the tick.
The Ectoparasite Survey by meat promotion agency Hybu Cig Cymru, funded by the Welsh Assembly Government through Farming Connect, found outbreaks of sheep scab, blowfly strike, ticks and lice occurring on 11.
2 million) to eliminate screwworms, the parasitic larvae of a greenish-blue blowfly species that feeds on the flesh of livestock and other warmblooded animals.
Effects of blowfly parasitism on eastern bluebird and tree swallow nestlings.
Researchers from Bradford University, West Yorkshire, have isolated chemicals from the larvae of the greenbottle blowfly and added them to a wound dressing that stimulates wound closure in human and mouse cells.
While the technology can be applied to all insect pests, the first application of this research is directed to environmentally friendly and safe control of sheep blowfly and body louse.
Effects of a toxicant on population growth rates: sublethal and delayed responses in blowfly populations.