whistle

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whis·tle

(wis'ĕl),
1. A sound made by forcing air through a narrow opening such as pursed lips.
2. An instrument for producing a whistle.
[A.S. hwistle]

whistle

(hwĭs′ĕl)
1. A sound produced by pursing one's lips and blowing.
2. A tubular device driven by wind that produces a loud and usually shrill sound.
References in periodicals archive ?
The survey showed that people mostly blow the whistle because they are absolutely angry over something that they feel is unfair or unjust," said Vadera.
There will be a positive relationship between perceptions of intention about organizational wrongdoing and decisions to blow the whistle.
A THE Public Interest Disclosure Act came into force in 1999 to provide protection against victimisation or dismissal to workers who blow the whistle in good faith on criminal behaviour or other wrongdoing.
However, when all is said and done, healthcare workers have a responsibility to blow the whistle to ensure ethical integrity for patients and the public.
The flight-line coordinator and I immediately yelled out to the tail walker to blow the whistle and stop the move, but the noise from some nearby flight line reconstruction, coupled with the turning aircraft, prevented the PC from hearing the whistle.
In my own experience, what protects incompetence in the bureaucracy is the spirit of collegiality that encourages government officials not to blow the whistle on the other guy's ineptitude lest he call attention to theirs.
The main difficulty for the UK now is the absence of an independent agency that will encourage athletes to come forward and blow the whistle on their competitors and really fight for a drug-free sport from within.
You have to be very brave or very naive to blow the whistle.
The charity Public Concern at Work said workers were twice as likely to blow the whistle on wrongdoings than they were five years ago.
Public Concern at Work, the charity which helps people raise concerns, said workers were twice as likely to blow the whistle on wrongdoings than they were five years ago.