bloodless

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blood·less

(blŭd'les),
Without blood.

bloodless

1 any organ or body part that lacks blood or appears to lack blood.
2 a surgical field in which the normal local blood supply has been shunted to other areas.

bloodless

(blŏd′lĕs)
1. Without blood.
2. Without the loss of blood, e.g., bloodless surgery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other characters are shot with arrows, mostly bloodlessly.
Civilian employees are not pawns that can be bloodlessly sacrificed by Pentagon officials.
The Egyptian Revolution of 2011 resolved itself relatively quickly, but not exactly bloodlessly.
Neither of them would give up the presidency easily or bloodlessly if elected.
He compared Abraham Lincoln to today's crop of go-for-the-jugular bloggers, pointing out that the much-loved president wrote vitriolic attacks on his political opponents, often under a false name, and once fought - bloodlessly, as it turned out - in a duel.
similar to that enacted bloodlessly in the literary metaphor.
Obama had hoped to meet Saturday with Walesa, the leader of the Solidarity movement which pushed Warsaw s communist regime from power bloodlessly in 1989 and was president from 1990 to 1995.
But his search of the dollar isn't one that isn't going to come bloodlessly, as well as plenty of other peril along the way.
The main purpose of this method is to give the impression that the dolphins are being killed bloodlessly and therefore according to humane standards.
Hershfield's thoughtful approach allows readers to remember and ponder ways image makers developed a form of communication which sought voicelessly to speak, bloodlessly to enact, and while itself immobile, to nonetheless travel into Mexico's large, universe of women.
If violence does occur during a blockade or the enforcement of sanctions, it generally takes place far out at sea or at a roadblock: the civilians, the real targets, die quietly and bloodlessly.
There was a moment of excitement when the volatile tenant above me, Francis Bacon's erstwhile boyfriend George Dyer, was lugged down our staircase after one of his frequent attempts to look as bloodlessly flayed as his portraits by Francis; I went through a curious, and never-to-be-repeated, chiaroscuro period, deciding to redo the studio in ultracontemporary style, all black and steel and mirrors.