blood-borne infection


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blood-borne in·fec·tion

(blŭd'bōrn in-fek'shŭn)
Infection transmitted through blood or blood products (e.g., hepatitis virus, HIV-1).

blood-borne infection

An infection transmitted through contact with the blood (cells, serum, or plasma) of an infected individual. The contact may occur sexually, through injection, or via a medical or dental procedure in which a blood-contaminated instrument is inadvertently used after inadequate sterilization. Examples of blood-borne infections include hepatitis B and C and AIDS.
needle-stick injury;
See also: infection
References in periodicals archive ?
SOUNDS ineffectual and could risk a serious blood-borne infection.
Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) is a chronic blood-borne infection which attacks the liver with potentially fatal effects.
1 Carrying a high potential for blood-borne infection, needle-stick injuries result in more than three dozen new cases of HIV, 2,000 cases of Hepatitis C and 400 cases of Hepatitis B among U.
The funding will support the Sexual Health Information Exchange Labrador District project to implement culturally appropriate community-based interventions to reduce sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBI).
The Middlesbrough Council report continued: "Carrying out tattooing in unhygienic conditions and using equipment that is not sterile can lead to the transmission of blood-borne infections such as HIV, Aids, Hepatitis A, B and C, and/or skin infections.
Some of the disadvantages in the treatment of PEDs with UCS are blood-borne infections missed in laboratory tests, infections in the window period, and contamination of UCS during preparation, transport, or storage; these might result in mild-to-serious local or systemic infections.
However, the growing use of alternative delivery methods, safety concerns, and risk of transmission of blood-borne infections may hinder the growth of the market.
Another factor is our zero rate of blood-borne infections which gives people reassurance and peace of mind.
Illegal tattooing by unregistered tattooists, or "scratchers", can result in scarring, infections and increase the risk of blood-borne infections such as HIV and hepatitis B.
Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and other blood-borne infections in healthcare workers: guidelines for prevention and management in industrialised countries.