blood substitute


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

blood sub·sti·tute

any material (for example, human plasma, serum albumin, or a solution of such substances as dextran) used for transfusion in hemorrhage and shock.

blood substitute

a substance used for a replacement or volume expansion for circulating blood. Plasma, human serum albumin, packed red cells, platelets, leukocytes, and concentrates of clotting factors are often administered in place of whole blood transfusions in the treatment of various disorders. Substances that are sometimes used to expand blood volume include dextran, hetastarch, albumin solutions, or plasma protein fraction. Perfluorocarbon emulsions, although potentially toxic, have been tested as blood substitutes; they are able to carry oxygen to tissues, have a long shelf life without refrigeration, and do not induce antigen-antibody reactions.

blood sub·sti·tute

(blŭd sŭbsti-tūt)
Material (e.g., human plasma, serum albumin, a solution of substances such as dextran) used for transfusion in hemorrhage and shock.

blood substitute

Any fluid substance used for transfusion that can perform one or more of the functions of blood. Blood substitutes include PLASMA solutions, dextran solutions and saline and other electrolyte solutions. Genuine blood substitutes that can transport oxygen are still in the experimental stages.
References in periodicals archive ?
HemoTech represents a second-generation blood substitute that uses novel pharmacological cross-linking technology (with adenosine and reduced glutathione), developed by Texas Tech scientists, to prevent the toxic reactions of hemoglobin that have appeared in the first generation products mentioned in the JAMA article above.
based lawyer who specializes in government affairs, said for two years in a row Congress has allocated $7 million to support research of blood substitute products.
HemoBioTech, a Dallas-based biopharmaceutical company, is engaged in the development of HemoTech, a novel human blood substitute technology exclusively licensed from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.
In addition, the candidates vow to: -- Find a major pharmaceutical partner for Northfield to provide cash and experienced management to get PolyHeme approved by the FDA; -- Ask Northfield to partner with companies to extend possible applications of PolyHeme as a transport delivery mechanism for other drugs; -- Work with the Department of Defense and the Homeland Security Agency to explore the possibility of stockpiling PolyHeme as a safe, effective blood substitute for emergencies; -- Gain representation on Northfield's board as independent directors; and -- Keep investors informed of Northfield news.
Composed of bovine hemoglobin, compatible with all blood types, and with a shelf life of 180+ days, HemoTech has shown the potential to be the first viable human blood substitute.
As a result of their work, scientists may someday be able to routinely "just add water" to reconstitute everything from freeze-dried orange juice to human sperm to blood substitutes used by combat medics in the treatment of wounded soldiers.
HemoBioTech's Human Blood Substitute, HemoTech, Highlighted in Scientific American Online, November 20, 2007: HemoTech, potentially the first viable substitute for human blood, was highlighted in the November 13, 2007 online edition of Scientific American as the lead story in its news section.
Other risks may include: competition from other blood substitute products; the company's and/or its representative's ability to successfully market and sell PolyHeme; the company's ability to manufacture PolyHeme in sufficient quantities; the company's ability to obtain an adequate supply of raw materials; the company's ability to maintain intellectual property protection for its proprietary product and to defend its existing intellectual property rights from challenges by third parties; the availability of capital to finance planned growth; and the extent to which the hospitals and physicians using PolyHeme are able to obtain third-party reimbursement, as described in the company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
He notes that under normal conditions a blood substitute would remain in the circulatory system and not fill the lungs.
com), a developmental biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing the first viable human blood substitute, has been highlighted in the January 5-11th issue of New Scientist.
Nasdaq: NFLD), a leading developer of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute, will host a webcast of its fiscal 2001 annual business update on Friday, August 31, 2001.
Nasdaq: NFLD), a leading developer of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute, today reported that late Friday, August 17, 2001, C.