blood meal


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blood meal

n.
The blood ingested in one feeding by a blood-sucking insect or arachnid such as a mosquito or tick.

blood meal

1. an epidemiological term meaning the stomach contents of a blood-sucking insect which can be used to study the spread of specific infections.
2. a protein supplement containing 80 to 85% of protein. Is too unpalatable to constitute a large proportion of the diet.
References in periodicals archive ?
05) affected, caution must be exercised in the use of rumen content/ blood meal in the rabbit's diets as an alternative protein source.
In addition to publishing the DNA sequence, Holt's group focused on a topic of considerable interest among malaria researchers: the genetic effects of the mosquito's blood meal.
Scarcely more than one-sixteenth of an inch in size, the seed ticks immediately begin looking for an appropriate source for their first blood meal.
In a few more days, the females are ready to search for their blood meal.
Infections were conducted in 4 separated experiments, with 1 of the 3 mosquito strains studied at a time, followed by the murine blood meal experiments.
According to the order : "The meat producing animals/poultry birds shall not be fed with feed containing meat and/or bone meal including internal organs, blood meal and tissues of bovine or porcine origin materials except milk and milk products.
Samples of fish meal, poultry byproduct meal, meat meal, bone meal, feather meal and blood meal were obtained from 10 different locations.
By introducing a specific chemical, we cause kidney failure in mosquitoes, and they can't eliminate fluids after a blood meal, Jerod Denton, Ph.
The mosquito's eating pattern is inherently risky--taking a blood meal involves finding warm-blooded hosts, avoiding detection, penetrating tough skin, and evading any host immune response (as well as the slap of a human hand).
The blood meal source was identified by microscopic examination and precipitin technique using human antiserum as described earlier (11).
When warm weather returns in spring, the mature ticks become active once again and resume their quest for a blood meal, which females need in order to complete the life cycle by mating and laying eggs.
As part of its life cycle the sheep tick, Ixodes ricinus, needs a blood meal from a host animal and the adult females are most likely to be found attached to the head, legs or other areas of skin not covered by wool.