blood gases


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blood gas·es

a clinical expression for blood gas analysis.
See also: blood gas analysis.

blood gas·es

(blŭd gas'ĕz)
A clinical expression for the determination of the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide in blood.

blood gases

normally refers to the oxygen and carbon dioxide that are dissolved in the arterial blood, following equilibration in the lungs between capillary blood and the gases in the alveoli. Measured as part of the assessment of lung function; expressed as partial pressures (or 'tensions') P O2 and P CO2. There is also a small amount of dissolved nitrogen, at a P N2 in equilibrium with alveolar nitrogen. See also hypoxia, hypercapnia, oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve.

blood gases

clinical determination of partial pressures of oxygen (P o2) and carbon dioxide (P co2) in venous blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood gases and respiratory pattern in exercising fowl: comparison in normoxic and hypoxic conditions.
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Quantification of medical and operational factors determining central versus satellite laboratory testing of blood gases.
Devices that originally provided only measurements of blood gases can now determine other critical-care analytes.
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