blood doping


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blood doping

use of erythrocyte transfusions or erythropoiesis-enhancing drugs to improve athletic performance.

blood doping

n.
The process of increasing the number of circulating red blood cells in order to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood for improved athletic endurance, performed by blood transfusion or administering erythropoietin. Also called blood boosting.

blood doping

the administration of blood, red blood cells, or related blood products to an athlete to enhance performance, often preceded by the withdrawal of blood so that training continues in a blood-depleted state.
A maneuver in which an athlete places a unit of autologous blood in storage to be transfused immediately before an endurance event—e.g., a long-distance race—resulting in increased athletic performance due to better O2 delivery to the tissues

blood dop·ing

(blŭd dōp'ing)
Infusion of red blood cells, usually freeze-preserved autologous packed red blood cells, to increase hematocrit and hemoglobin levels; used by endurance athletes to increase blood's oxygen-carrying capacity and thus enhance endurance performance.
Synonym(s): blood boosting, induced erythrocythemia.

blood doping

a procedure banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA): the administration of a blood transfusion to a sportsman or sportswoman in order to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood and as a result to improve performance. Most commonly, this involves removing up to a litre of the person's blood and storing this while the body's normal mechanisms replace the loss. At a later date, usually just prior to competition, the removed blood is transfused back into the circulation. Though banned, it is still used in some sports such as athletics and cycling as detection is difficult. The procedure is considered to be against the ethics of sport. Risks include renal damage, transmission of infection and circulatory overload.
References in periodicals archive ?
stated, "In response to recent, widespread discoveries of blood doping in endurance athletes, Sanguine has joined with other pharmaceutical manufacturers of blood oxygenating products to promote the development of anti-doping strategies and activities.
Despite indications to the contrary my A sample from the Olympics, the one that first brought on this issue, was initially determined to be negative for blood doping.
It is expected to call Armstrong and the five associates to a trial hearing to answer questions about blood doping.
From the moment he become a professional cyclist in 1993 and possibly even before, he had been systematically using drugs, in particular the blood doping agent erythropoietin (r-EPO), under the medical supervision of his teams' doctors.
Ullrich, 32, was withdrawn from this year's Tour by his team before it started when he was linked by the media to an investigation in Spain into alleged blood doping.
It emerged he had been addicted to cocaine since autumn 1999, weeks after being expelled from the Tour of Italy for blood doping.
3 runner, senior Chelsea Johnstone, is starting to improve after a midseason slump that coach Rene Paragas said he thinks was caused by a blood donation, something he called, ``the opposite of blood doping.
A LEADING blood doping expert has posed fresh questions over the "triangle" involving disgraced Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, a payment by him to the UCI and a drug-testing laboratory.
The report, which included witness testimony from 11 former teammates, accused Armstrong of cheating through the use of EPO, blood doping and other drugs and pushing his teammates to do the same.
Pre-race favourite Alexander Vinokourov was thrown out after testing positive for blood doping on stage 16 and Michael Rasmussen was three minutes ahead of the field and odds-on to take the title when he was withdrawn by his Rabobank team for misleading them over his training schedule.
JAN ULLRICH (WINNER 1997): Evidence found after police raid that he had undergone blood doping - where blood is taken from an athlete and then injected back before a race.
However, in their annual report WADA said a test to detect excess human growth hormone has been finalised, whereas research on blood doping tests is 'well under way'.