blocking effect


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blocking effect

In classic conditioning, the failure of a new stimulus to become a conditioned stimulus, if accompanied by an already effective conditioned stimulus during the conditioning phase.
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted, however, that post hoc exclusion of data not in accordance with a blocking effect (i.
Similarly to decrease of molecular weight, a temperature increase provokes a chain mobility enhancement, which conducts to a detection of the blocking effect of the ordered microdomains at shorter times.
This wall-slip phenomenon, typical of dense suspensions, is associated with a solid-like response of the polymer melt, derived in this case from the aforementioned blocking effect of PS cylinders.
Application parameters were not found significant in relation to popping from this phase; whereas the blocking effect, which includes film build, was found significant.
Hibberd--who shares his first name with generations of Puritan clergymen, including Cotton Mather of Salem witch trial fame--begins his consultation by telling Enid, a seventy-five-year-old Midwestern Presbyterian, that Asian "exerts a remarkable blocking effect on `deep' or `morbid' shame," he gets, as he observes, her full attention.
The Wind Iris will help the company to guage the free stream wind speed ahead of the turbine, where the blocking effect is minimal.
They also found that AB as small aggregates-and not large plaques of AB-had this same blocking effect.
A stimulus control analysis of the picture-word problem in children who are mentally retarded: The blocking effect.
Eating soya products, such as tofu and soya milk, can also reduce your risk of breast cancer, as they contain compounds called phytoestrogens, which have an oestrogen blocking effect.
If we put something with this blocking effect in that area, then we're in trouble - and we are putting something in there," he added.
2+] channel blocking effect of iso-S-petasin in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.
The blocking effect has profound implications for the study of learning, for it suggests that the temporal contiguity between stimuli may not always be sufficient for conditioning to occur.