blindfolding

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blindfolding

covering a horse's eyes with a blindfold as a means of restraint. Most horses when blindfolded can be persuaded to load onto trailers which they refuse to do without the blindfold. Of some but more limited use in other species. A comparable device used in pigs, a bucket placed over the head, causes the pig to walk backwards. Provided the rear of the pig is pointed in the correct direction this is a worthwhile last try in getting a large pig to go where you want it to go.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Blindfold Artist provides few details but this is an excellent checklist of items to consider.
Video analyses showed that kids given experience with a regular blindfold spent little time following the experimenter's presumed gaze, a sign that they assumed the blindfolded person couldn't see.
Now give your partner the blindfold and clothespin and let him try.
Guided like a blind man to a car, they told me to sit slumped forward, obviously to prevent me from seeing where we were going in case the blindfold slipped.
Do not try this at home," joked Dresser to the capacity audience as the blindfold was secured on him during one demonstration - referring to the act of replacing an iPod battery blindfolded.
In 2016, the Supreme Court again lifted the blindfold, and with unusual powers of sight beheld that Gloria Arroyo - president of the Philippines at the time of the plunder of state lottery funds - was not the 'main plunderer' in the case.
The self-proclaimed Blindfold King showed his prowess back in 2013 when he won 29 matches and lost none in a 10-hour chess marathon.
Then blindfold the kids and let them guess what they are by touch alone.
WITH blindfolds in place, these bus drivers got a taste of what it is like for their passengers with sight problems.
Keith said: "I was doing a stunt that involved me driving with a blindfold on.
Crowds - including Dragons' Den star Duncan Bannatyne - joined PC David Rathband in the blindfold "goodwill walk" to raise money for emergency services staff injured in the line of duty.
Mr Moore, 36, from Lincoln, told Channel 4 News: "They handcuff me behind my back, blindfold me, walk me out into another room, and they kneel me down.