blind intubation

blind intubation

blind in·tu·ba·tion

(blīnd in-tū-bā'shŭn)
Placement of an endotracheal tube without direct visualization of the glottic opening. The hand and fingers may be used to guide placement of the endotracheal tube.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The possible cause for the lesser increase in IOP and blood pressure in ILMA-guided blind intubation may be lesser adrenergic stimulation at supraglottic level, and also at subglottic level due to the soft tip and well-lubricated silicon tube.
Joo and Rose(6) reported that the haemodynamic response to blind and fibreoptic-guided intubation with the ILMA was less than the response to conventional laryngoscope-guided tracheal intubation whereas Kihara et al(7) observed that blind intubation through an ILMA had no advantage over laryngoscope-guided tracheal intubation in patients with normal airways.
After three failed attempts, or if the best quality of laryngeal view remained poor, one blind intubation attempt was allowed in the CTrach[TM] group.
When blind intubation after three failed intubations under fibreoptic guidance for the CTrach[TM] is included in the analysis, there was no difference detected in the overall success rate of both airway devices (P=0.
For the severely retrognathic infant or child, airway management frequently involves blind intubation or tracheostomy under local anesthesia.
Blind intubation through the laryngeal mask airway for management of the difficult airway in infants.
There has however, been a case report of a fatal oesophageal rupture with blind intubation through an intubating laryngeal mask (18).
Pharyngeal wall perforation--an unusual complication of blind intubation with a gum elastic bougie.
They also include blind intubation (oral or nasal) and fibreoptic intubation in their list of techniques for difficult airway management.
Two of the coauthors hold patents on airway device inventions used extensively in securing difficult airways: Michael Frass, professor of medicine at the Medical University of Vienna, designed the Combitube, an esophageal-tracheal double-lumen airway for combined endotracheal and esophageal obturator ventilation, and George Beck designed an airflow indicator, or "whistle," for facilitating blind intubations.