blepharospasm


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blepharospasm

 [blef´ah-ro-spaz″m]
spasm of the orbicular muscle of the eyelid.

bleph·a·ro·spasm

, blepharospasmus (blef'ă-rō-spazm', -spaz'mŭs),
Involuntary spasmodic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle; may occur in isolation or be associated with other dystonic contractions of facial, jaw, or neck muscles; usually initiated or aggravated by emotion, fatigue, or drugs.

blepharospasm

(blĕf′ə-rō-spăz′əm)
n.
Spasmodic winking caused by the involuntary contraction of an eyelid muscle.

blepharospasm

[blef′ərōspaz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, blepharon, eyelid, spasmos, spasm
the involuntary contraction of eyelid muscles. The condition may be caused by a local lesion of the eye, a neurological irritation, or psychological stress.

blepharospasm

A focal dystonia consisting of involuntary twitching of one or both eyelids; the spasms may completely close the eyelids which, with time, causes functional blindness even if the vision is normal.
 
Clinical findings
Blinking or spasms of the eyelids, dry eyes, photosensitivity.

Aetiology
Emotional stress, sleep deprivation or use of stimulants—e.g., amphetamines, caffeine, nicotine, decongestants.

Management
Botulinum toxin (Botox), surgery (protractor myomectory), dark glasses for photosensitivity.

blepharospasm

Neurology A focal dystonia consisting of the involuntary twitching of one or both eyelids; the spasms may completely close the eyelids, causing functional blindness even if the vision is normal Etiology Related to emotional stress, sleep deprivation or use of stimulants–eg, amphetamines, caffeine, nicotine, decongestants

bleph·a·ro·spasm

, blepharospasmus (blef'ă-rō-spazm, -spaz'mŭs)
Involuntary spasmodic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle.

blepharospasm

Uncontrollable winking or sustained tight closure of the eyes caused by involuntary contraction of the flat eyelid muscle under the skin. Blepharospasm may result from a sharp foreign body in the eye or a corneal ulcer, but also occurs as a psychologically induced TIC. Botulinum toxin has been found useful in this condition.

blepharospasm 

Tonic or chronic spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle which involves involuntary closure of the eyelids. It is often provoked by a foreign body in the eye, an abrasion or inflammation of the cornea or conjunctiva, or by excessive exposure to ultraviolet light (e.g. actinic keratoconjunctivitis). Treatment consists chiefly of injection into the muscles around the eyelids of botulinum toxin. See botulinum toxin; chemodenervation; actinic keratoconjunctivitis; orbicularis muscle.

bleph·a·ro·spasm

, blepharospasmus (blef'ă-rō-spazm, -spaz'mŭs)
Involuntary spasmodic contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle; may occur in isolation or be associated with other dystonic contractions of facial, jaw, or neck muscles.

blepharospasm

spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle of the eyelid.

Patient discussion about blepharospasm

Q. eyelids what causes your eye lids too twitch? my left eye lid has been twitching on and off for about a week what causes it and how can i get it to stop.

A. Not an answer, just another question - how long can this go on? My eyelid has been twitching, (likely lack of sleep) for almost a month now. Any treatment that I should seek?

More discussions about blepharospasm
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2009, he was once again given lithium 1200 mg/day and quetiapine 600 mg/day for four months because of a manic episode; he had developed oromandibular dystonia again, in addition to blepharospasm characterized as eyelid spasm and had difficulty in keeping his eyes open.
The blepharospasm remained unchanged; however, the blepharedema, conjunctival hyperemia, and chemosis continued to improve.
However, after repetitive BTX treatments in 42 patients with blepharospasm, there was no decline in benefit [5].
However, a recent research report indicated that caffeine had a preventative effect and the exact cause of benign essential blepharospasm is unknown.
Dermatologists, however, say the Botox business couldn't be better - although the Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing the drug only to treat eye tics, known as blepharospasm, and crossed eyes, called strabismus.
The toxin relieves a relatively common condition called blepharospasm, in which the eyelids of those afflicted close involuntarily, making it impossible to do such simple things as driving or reading.
Indeed, the Food and Drug Administration last February approved Type A treatment for people 13 years and older afflicted with any of three dystonias: strabismus, benign essential blepharospasm (spasmodic closing of the eyelids) and hemifacial spasm (in which one half of the face undergoes sudden muscle contractions).
BOTOX[R] was first approved by the FDA more than 22 years ago for the treatment of strabismus and blepharospasm, two eye muscle disorders, making it the first botulinum toxin type A product approved in the world.
Moreover, 4 (50%) of the 8 patients with tardive CD had additional movement disorders besides CD (1 had blepharospasm, 2 had hand/arm dystonia, and 1 had hand tremor), and 2 patients with birth trauma had additional hand/arm and truncal dystonia.
The ulcer was not associated with blepharospasm or ocular discharge and was presumed to be secondary to trauma while the bird was being caught.