bleb

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Related to blebs: pneumothorax

bulla

 [bul´ah] (pl. bul´lae) (L.)
1. a circumscribed, fluid-containing, elevated lesion of the skin, usually more than 5 mm in diameter. Called also blister and bleb.
2. an anatomical structure with a blisterlike appearance. adj., adj bul´late, bul´lous.

bleb

(blĕb),
1. A large flaccid vesicle.
2. An air-filled lung cyst within or contiguous to the visceral pleura, usually seen radiologically at the lung apex; more likely to develop and to rupture with resulting pneumothorax in taller people. Compare: bulla.

bleb

(bleb) a large flaccid vesicle, usually at least 1 cm. in diameter.

bleb

(blĕb)
n.
1. A small blister or pustule.
2. An air bubble.

bleb′by adj.

bleb

[bleb]
Etymology: ME, blob
an accumulation of fluid under the skin.

bleb

Cell biology
A hemispherical protrusion from a cell’s surface, which may be filled with fluid or supported by a network of microfilaments.

Pulmonology
A saccular subpleural expansion of lung tissue measuring up to 1 cm in greatest dimension (bullae are larger), often located at the apex, which is more common in tall male smokers and may be accompanied by spontaneous pneumothorax.

bleb

(bleb)
1. A large, flaccid vesicle.
2. An acquired lung cyst, usually smaller than 1 cm in diameter, similar to but smaller than a bulla, which is thought to be the most common cause of spontaneous pneumothorax. Blebs occurmainly in the apex of the lung.

bleb

A blister-like collection of fluid, within or under the epidermis of the skin, usually containing serum or blood.

bleb

a minute amount of local anaesthetic solution delivered to the dermoepidermal junction, creating a small area of anaesthetized skin, allowing subsequent painfree delivery of the main injection

bleb

a large flaccid vesicle, usually at least 0.5 inch in diameter.

pulmonary bleb
small pocket of air under the visceral pleura; may be congenital or acquired.

Patient discussion about bleb

Q. What's the best treatment for a blister?

A. use a clean needle and poke a small hole right at the base, between normal skin and the blister. Push the blister down, allow it to drain completely and put a bandaid over it; don't ever rip off blister skin allow it to fall off or reattach naturally.

Q. What are the causes of viral blisters on the skin? For a few months now I've been having these hard viral blisters on my fingers. The only way to get rid of them is with freezed carbon. It does go away with that treatment- after a few weeks but then a new one appears. How can I prevent it from "attacking" again??

A. These viral blisters you are describing are caused by HPV (papilloma virus), and are very hard to get rid of without treatment with freezed carbon. Many of us have the virus but not everyone gets the actual infection. There is not a proved way of preventing from it to happen again after treatment, unfortunately..

More discussions about bleb
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in pulmonary emphysema, alveolar septal destruction promotes the enlargement of alveoli, manifested as blebs and bullae.
The sides of the blebs formed the endoplasmic reticulum and their inner surfaces formed the outer membrane of the nucleus, with the original outer membrane of the archaeon becoming what we now call the inner nuclear membrane.
Apoptotic blebs are protrusive blisters formed when cellular plasma membrane delaminates from the cortical cytoskeleton, covering the entire surface of apoptotic cells.
The cysts were lined by reactive hobnail cells, representing either hyperplastic type 2 pneumocytes or mesothelial cells and were, therefore, different from blebs (intrapleural, unlined collections of air).
In addition, the finding of blebs on cardiac cells has led to the speculation that cardiac troponins might be released via blebs (9).
Pleural blebs are common and pneumothoraces can be recurrent and difficult to treat (11).
The AML cases that cannot be distinguished by morphology and cytochemistry, specifically MO and M7, for which the presence of myeloid dysplasia in the former and the cytoplasmic blebs in the latter may give a hint for the probable diagnosis, however there is still the need for more positive diagnostic technique and as the flow cytometry immunophenotyping is not available then the use of a limited number of CD markers study by immunohistochemistry to identify the lineage of acute leukaemia is the option, these include CD33, anti-myeloperoxidase and CD41.
Carvacrol-treated cells showed prominent morphological changes like cell shrinkage with rounding of cells and formation of membrane blebs characteristic of apoptosis as evidenced by microscopic studies (Fig.
Within two blocks of this intersection we can see a beautiful polished slab of sodalite with blebs of magnetite that can stop a speeding magnet (Fig.
11) Genetic defects in the complement cascade associated with SLE result in inadequate clearance of immune complexes, as well as apoptotic blebs containing autoantigens.
mainly as blebs and fracture fills and less in quartz veinlets.
Larger blebs have been suggested as resulting in longer periods of effective relief (Martensson, McSwiggin et al.