blastogenesis


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blastogenesis

 [blas″to-jen´ĕ-sis]
1. development of an individual from a blastema, i.e., by asexual reproduction.
2. transmission of inherited characters by the germ plasm.
3. morphological transformation of small lymphocytes into large lymphocytes (lymphoblasts) that accompanies lymphocyte activation.

blas·to·gen·e·sis

(blas'tō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. Reproduction of unicellular organisms by budding.
2. Development of an embryo during cleavage and germ layer formation.
3. Transformation of small lymphocytes of human peripheral blood in tissue culture into large, morphologically primordial blastlike cells capable of undergoing mitosis; can be induced by various agents including phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, certain antigens to which the cell donor has been previously immunized, and leukocytes from an unrelated individual.
[blasto- + G. genesis, origin]

blastogenesis

/blas·to·gen·e·sis/ (blas″to-jen´ĕ-sis)
1. development of an individual from a blastema, i.e., by asexual reproduction.
2. transmission of inherited characters by the germ plasm.
3. morphological transformation of small lymphocytes into larger cells resembling blast cells on exposure to phytohemagglutinin or to antigens to which the donor is immunized.blastogenet´icblastogen´ic

blastogenesis

(blăs′tə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
1. The transformation of small lymphocytes into larger cells that are capable of undergoing mitosis.
2. The development of an embryo during cleavage and germ layer formation.
3. Reproduction of an organism by budding.

blas′to·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), blas′to·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

blastogenesis

[blas′tōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, blastos + genein, to produce
1 asexual reproduction by budding.
2 the transmission of hereditary characteristics by the germ plasm. Compare pangenesis.
3 the early development of an embryo during cleavage and formation of the germ layers.
4 the process of transforming small lymphocytes in tissue culture into large, blastlike cells by exposure to phytohemagglutinin or other substances, often for the purpose of inducing mitosis. blastogenetic, adj.

blastogenesis

(1) The theory that inherited characteristics are transmitted from parent to offspring by germ plasm. Similar to the concept of embryogenesis.
(2) Reproduction of an organism by budding.
(3) The transformation of small lymphocytes into larger cells that are capable of undergoing mitosis. See blast transformation.
(4) The development of an embryo during cleavage and germ layer formation.

blas·to·gen·e·sis

(blas'tō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Reproduction of unicellular organisms by budding.
2. Development of an embryo during cleavage and germ layer formation.
3. Transformation of small lymphocytes of human peripheral blood in tissue culture into large, morphologically primordial blastlike cells capable of undergoing mitosis.
[blasto- + G. genesis, origin]

blastogenesis

1. development of an individual from a blastema, i.e. by asexual reproduction.
2. transmission of inherited characters by the germ plasm.
3. morphological transformation of small lymphocytes into larger cells resembling blast cells on exposure to phytohemagglutin, or to antigens to which the donor is immunized.
References in periodicals archive ?
To quantify the effect of o,p'-DDE on humoral immunity, we determined the ability of splenic leukocytes to undergo blastogenesis and express SIgM upon in vitro mitogenic stimulation with LPS.
Percentage of cells undergoing blastogenesis after 4 days of in vitro activation with TCM or LPS.
There were no significant differences between treatments for the percentage of cells undergoing blastogenesis after incubation with TCM alone (one-way ANOVA, p > 0.
At the time of sampling for blastogenesis and SIgM, the median weight of fish in the 10-ppm treatment group was significantly lower than that of the controls for this sampling event (Mann-Whitney U test, p = 0.
The ability of splenic leukocytes to undergo blastogenesis, when stimulated in vitro for 4 days with LPS, was significantly reduced in fish that showed uptake of DDE during the exposure.
were no significant effects on blastogenesis in the mixed lymphocyte
Humor associated laughter decreases Cortisol and increases spontaneous lymphocyte blastogenesis [abstract].
Comment: Immune responsiveness, including blastogenesis, is important in repelling invasion of the human body by potentially pathogenic microorganisms.
Stress-induced corticosteroids inhibit immune function further by also causing eosinopenia, T-cell blastogenesis, granulocytosis, and inhibited basophil, mast cell, and neutrophil function.