blastema


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blastema

 [blas-te´mah]
1. in species with asexual reproduction, a group of cells that give rise to a new individual.
2. in other species, a group of cells that gives rise to an organ or part in either normal development or regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă),
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

/blas·te·ma/ (blas-te´mah) a group of cells giving rise to a new individual (in asexual reproduction) or to an organ or part (in either normal development or in regeneration).blaste´mic

blastema

(blă-stē′mə)
n. pl. blaste·mas or blaste·mata (-mə-tə)
1. A mass of undifferentiated cells from which an organ or a body part develops, either in normal development or in the regeneration of a lost body part.
2. A structureless substance from which it was formerly believed that cells are formed.

blas·te′mal, blas′te·mat′ic (blăs′tə-măt′ĭk)(blă-stē′mĭk), blas·te′mic (blă-stē′mĭk) adj.

blastema

[blastē′mə] pl. blastemas, blastemata
Etymology: Gk, bud
1 any mass of cells capable of growth and differentiation, specifically the primordial, undifferentiated cellular material from which a particular organ or tissue develops.
2 in certain animals, a group of cells capable of regenerating a lost or damaged part or creating a complete organism in asexual reproduction.
3 the budding or sprouting area of a plant. See also primordium. blastemal, blastematic, blastemic, adj.

blastema

A group of cells in a multicellular organism which are capable of developing into a new individual by asexual reproduction or into tissues and organs by regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă)
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

an undifferentiated mass of animal cells that later forms a structure or organ either embryologically or through regeneration, e.g. the head of a flatworm.

blastema

1. the primitive substance from which cells are formed.
2. a group of cells that will give rise to a new individual, in asexual reproduction, or to an organ or part, in either normal development or in regeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gardiner, both at the University of California, Irvine, have turned to salamanders called axolotls to study how a blastema transforms itself into a limb.
The blastema first specifies which cells will form the axolotl "hand," concludes Bryant.
While a limb blastema can produce its own FGF-2, the scientists believe it needs an initial supply from nerves before it becomes self-sufficient.
The most significant seems to be that the worms do not dedifferentiate cells to create the blastema.
Wherever planaria are cut, the neoblasts migrate to the site and form a blastema by themselves.
These genes code for a variety of transcription and growth factors required for the regulation and orchestration of interactions between the ureteric bud and the metanephric blastema and its predecessor's tissues, the mesonephric and pronephric ducts.
Such developmental alterations from nephrogenic blastema to glomeruli and proximal convoluted tubules may explain some of the immunohistochemical (11,188) and ultrastructural (201) variations in GCK, (19) as well as alterations of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.
3) The presence of cartilage in mesoblastic nephroma invokes a differential diagnosis of Wilms tumor, but features favoring Wilms tumor over mesoblastic nephroma include the presence of skeletal muscle and blastema, age older than 1 year, bilateral tumors, and nephrogenic rests.
Wider septa and solid areas did contain mature tubular elements, but no blastema, renal parenchyma, or other mesenchymal elements.