blast injury


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blast in·ju·ry

tearing of lung tissue or rupture of any tissue or organ without external injury, as by the force of an explosion.
An injury due to explosions or rapid decompression, the severity of which is a direct function of the intensity of the blast wave; death is caused by exsanguination from ruptured pulmonary vessels with haemorrhage, haemoptysis, air embolism, hypoxia, and respiratory failure; other lesions include cardiac contusion, causing arrhythmia, rupture of hollow organs, cerebral injuries—parenchymal hemorrhage and air embolism—and rupture of tympanic membranes
Management Supportive; if air embolism is present, hyperbaric oxygen is indicated; other facets of blast injuries include impinging flying objects and whether the subject was submerged or free-standing at the time of the explosion

blast injury

Trauma medicine An injury due to explosions or rapid decompression, the severity of which is a direct function of the intensity of the blast wave; death is caused by exsanguination from ruptured pulmonary vessels with hemorrhage, hemoptysis, air embolism, hypoxia, and respiratory failure; other lesions include cardiac contusion, causing arrhythmia, rupture of hollow organs, cerebral injuries–parenchymal hemorrhage and air embolism, and rupture of tympanic membranes Treatment Supportive; if air embolism is present, hyperbaric oxygen is indicated; other facets of blast injuries include impinging flying objects and whether the subject was submerged or free-standing at the time of the explosion. Cf Nuclear war.

blast in·ju·ry

(blast in'jŭr-ē)
Tearing of lung tissue or rupture of abdominal viscera without external injury, as by the force of an explosion.
References in periodicals archive ?
A mouse model of ocular blast injury that induces closed globe anterior and posterior pole damage.
Blast injury face: An exemplified review of management.
This phenomenon was likely observed in 1 nonexplosive (compressed-air injury) and 1 explosive blast injury (fireworks injury) in the current study.
A blast injury event was defined as the presence of a blast-related mechanism of injury and/or ICD-9-CM external cause of injury code (E code) in the EMED clinical record.
Military blast injury in Iraq and Afghanistan: the Veterans Health Administration's polytrauma system of care.
Given these risks, it is critical to accurately identify higher-order vestibular deficits following combat-related blast injury.
Among those Veterans who were only involved in blast injuries, 78 had identified the most intense type of blast injury they experienced during the second-level evaluation as 85.
Conclusion: Most patients who survive a lung blast injury will regain good lung function within one year.
A key unresolved question concerns the unique aspects and damage caused by primary blast injury, which may or may not be accompanied with acceleration/deceleration injury.
Combat blast injury is a common cause of traumatic brain injury and injuries to other areas of the body.
While the brain is clearly vulnerable to secondary and tertiary blast injury, an unresolved controversy is whether primary blast injury directly damages the brain.
Therefore, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach is essential for the evaluation and treatment of patients with TBI to minimize the consequences of blast injury.