blanket bog


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to blanket bog: peat bog

blanket bog

an upland area of very wet peat formation, developed on poorly drained flat surfaces, which completely covers the ground surface and obliterates other topographical features. Sedges predominate, though Sphagnum, which probably dominated before Man's activities, is also extensive. See RAISED BOG, BOG, FEN.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The new research by the University of Leeds has provided a big boost to safeguarding fragile upland blanket bogs along access routes by demonstrating that it is possible to use some vehicles on blanket bog habitats while minimising damage.
The five-year scheme is run by Moors for the Future Partnership, with partners including the Environment Agency, Natural England and MoorLIFE project, which protected 2,500 hectares of blanket bog in the Peak District and South Pennines between 2010 and 2015.
An area of blanket bog is central to the environment depicted in the opening lines of Rathlin, which presents a twilight scene from the headland of Benmore, or Fairhead, in north-east Ireland: (10)
The causes of blanket bog degradation, a result of the impact of the pollution killing the mosses that formed a major component of blanket bog vegetation, was exacerbated by other factors including inappropriate land management activities/ intensities, wildfires and high recreational pressure.
The remote pass cuts through a vast expanse of blanket bog and made for an exhilarating 90-minute drive during which we saw no other signs of life.
swans, spongy grass and blanket bog, each inch a million years.
A raised bog as opposed to a blanket bog, is one which is still growing.
3m, the highest values representing areas of blanket bog.
What I have in mind is a Welsh scheme to plant deciduous trees in the National Park, or conserve upland blanket bog (as carbon sinks)," he writes.
Krachler, "Lithogenic, oceanic, and anthropogenic sources of Sb to a maritime blanket bog, Myrarnar, Faroe Islands," Journal of Environmental Monitoring 7, (2005) pp.
This area encompasses blanket bog, mountains, rivers, springs and lakes.
The blanket bog and lower moorland slopes provide homes to important populations of rare birds, such as hen harrier, peregrine falcon, merlin, golden plover, black grouse and skylark.