bladder retraining

bladder retraining

Etymology: AS, blaedre + L, trahere, to draw
a system of therapy for urinary incontinence in which a patient practices withholding urine while maintaining a normal intake of fluid. The interval between urination is increased from about 1 hour to 3 to 4 hours over a period of 10 days. The patient also learns to recognize and react to the urge to urinate.

bladder retraining

The use of behavioural therapy to manage an overactive bladder, which basically consists of not urinating for 10 or 15 minutes, to re-accustom the bladder to holding larger volumes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Different treatment options are available for OAB, including lifestyle or behavioural changes, such as pelvic floor strengthening, bladder retraining, and management of daily fluid intake.
Your GP can assess whether you have incontinence, decide which type you have, give general advice on controlling symptoms, provide information on pelvic floor exercises and bladder retraining, and give treatment with prescribed medicines.
The Women's Health Program utilizes treatment options that include: internal soft tissue mobilization, muscle re-education, postural alignment, biofeedback/surface electromyography, electrical stimulation, bladder retraining, diet education, muscle energy technique, myofascial release, therapeutic exercises, including the Pelvicore program, and joint mobilization.
For irritable bladder, there's bladder retraining and muscle relaxant drugs.
However, it is recommended treatment for urge incontinence begin with six weeks of bladder retraining before moving on to drug therapy.
Behavioural interventions including urge suppression strategies, delayed voiding and bladder retraining are widely recognised in managing UUI.
Bladder retraining NEXT time you feel the urge to urinate hold on for five minutes more.
We can also advise on pelvic floor, muscle reeducation and bladder retraining, as sometimes all it takes is a little re-education.
Mr Almallah said the success rate was high and most people could control their symptoms through bladder retraining, physiotherapy or medication.
Bladder retraining programs are effective but require the resident to have cognitive processing ability, along with the ability to discern urge sensation and to toilet independently or with assistance.
If these measures don't work, biofeedback preferably with bladder retraining should be the next step.
The interventions most frequently employed were fluid management, abstaining from caffeine, and bladder retraining.