black

(redirected from blackness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Black

(blak),
Greene V., U.S. dentist, 1836-1915. See: Black classification.

black

(blak) reflecting no light or true color; of the darkest hue.

black

Medspeak-UK
A person who, for the purposes of equal opportunity monitoring, has Black ethnic lineage, which includes, but is not limited to, British Blacks, regardless of where they were raised or educated.

Medspeak-US
A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as "Black, African American, or Negro," or provide written entries such as Afro American, Kenyan, Nigerian or Haitian.

politically correct

Politically sensitive adjective Referring to language reflecting awareness and sensitivity to another person's physical, mental, cultural, or other disadvantages or deviations from a norm; a person is not mentally retarded, but rather mentally challenged; a person is not obese but rather has an eating disorder, etc
Politically correct-a microglossary
Former term PC term
American Indian Native American
Black African American
Demented Disoriented, severely confused
Handicapped Disadvantaged
Homophobic Heterosexually biased
Housebound Domestic
(American) Indian  Native American
Mentally retarded Mentally disabled or challenged
Obese Large, ample, right-sized
Oriental  Asian
Physically handicapped Physically disadvantaged
Poorly educated Educationally disadvantaged
Racist Culturally insensitive
Stupid Educationally challenged
Politically correct ad absurdum–a microglossary
PCAA term Translation
Colorful Flaky, fruity
Detail oriented  Anal-retentive or, if extreme, obsessive compulsive
Eccentric  Nuts, weird
Enthusiastic & hopeful  Insufferably arrogant
Follicly challenged  Bald
Knowledge deficient Ignorant
Obtunded Stupid
Sexual arts specialist  Prostitute, hooker
Sexual arts aficionado  Slut, sleaze
Vertically challenged Short
Vertically enhanced  Tall
Visually challenged Myopic  

black 

A visual sensation having no colour and being of extremely low luminosity.

black

1. without color, at the opposite end of the spectrum to white; the color of soot.
2. a universally accepted coat color. In horses, solid black with no pattern in it, the muzzle is black, and there may be white markings on the lower limbs and the head.

Patient discussion about black

Q. Why would your poop be black?

A. If it is black or black and tar like, it could mean a gastro bleed.

Q. My nails are black- is it dangerous? Hi, I was diagnosed with colon cancer and now I receive chemotherapy. This morning I found that my nails are brown and blue, and other nails have white lines on them. Is that dangerous? Should go and see a doctor?

A. The chemo can cause several changes in your nail, e.g. make them brittle etc. You can find some more info at : http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/hair_skin_nails/nails.jsp

Q. Has anyone tried black cohosh for the later years in life?

A. my mother in law took it, she said it was very helpful but it could be a placebo effect... here is some info about black cohosh from a very relay able site

More discussions about black
References in periodicals archive ?
For this reason, I find that the principle of Sameness and Difference in either its religious or biological formulation is an insufficient point of departure for the question of Blackness.
Porgy and Bess has been the subject of much of the early discussion on depictions of blackness on the operatic stage.
While many of the essays in this issue consider the recuperation of blackness and the black body through movement, "Fasten Your Shackles" examines the limitations of blackness as a category in the late twentieth century.
5) The negative reaction to blackface in Germany, in other words, was not due to a lack of knowledge about blacks or the irrelevance of blackness to German culture; rather, it was a direct result of increasing contact between Germans and peoples of African descent.
His portrayal of blackness and whiteness can be both within the bounds of current semantic association, while also displaying semantic opposition to conventional English expectations.
For instance, respondents who are black, as reported in the first column of results, have names that are less popular, more syllables and higher Scrabble scores, fewer "oh" endings, are more likely to end in a vowel, and have a higher blackness index.
The twinning of somatic Blackness and inferiority was the accomplishment of Western Modernity with stories that rationalized the slave trade on the basis of skin colour alone (p.
Lhamon claims the baby's appearance reflected both the desire of Whites for blackness as well as the desire of Whites to keep their identities separate from those of Blacks.
It is clear here that Pushkin is affirming Gannibal's "literal" blackness (the darkness of his skin), while refuting negative inferences about his ancestor's purportedly servile situation.
In the process, she problematizes the Puerto Rican myth of racial democracy and reggaeton's perceived association in the popular imagination with either blackness or Latinidad.
Immediately, she was confronted by the many negative stereotypes and scripts about black people and blackness held by her mostly white peers, many members of her family, and the media.
Race and the Brazilian Body: Blackness, Whiteness, and Everyday Language in Rio de Janeiro.