blackleg

(redirected from blacklegged)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

blackleg

(blăk′lĕg′)
n.
An infectious, usually fatal bacterial disease of cattle and sometimes of sheep, goats, and swine, caused by Clostridium chauvoei and characterized by gas-containing swellings in the musculature.
Veterinary medicine An often lethal disease of young calves and sheep, characterised by a settling of gelatinous matter in the extremities and neck caused by Clostridium chauvoei, the spores of which can live in the soil for years and which are ingested and enter the blood via defects in the gastrointestinal mucosa

blackleg

an acute, infectious myositis principally of cattle, caused by Clostridium chauvoei. The lesion arises without the need for any external injury. The animal is profoundly toxemic with a high fever and usually a very swollen painful thigh. The skin is gangrenous, and emphysema can be palpated in the subcutis. Death occurs in 12 to 36 hours.

pseudo-blackleg
see malignant edema. Called also gas gangrene.
stable blackleg
see malignant edema. Called also gas gangrene.
References in periodicals archive ?
burgdorferi-infected blacklegged tick population in Nova Scotia was identified in a rural region within DHA 1 in 2003.
While the research is not completed, EPA s preliminary analysis detected an effect of the experimental four-poster treatments on blacklegged tick abundance.
Keywords: Blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, Lyme disease, Indiana
Forage location, diet, and productivity of blacklegged kittiwakes in 2001 and 2002 in Chiniak Bay, Kodiak Alaska (Abstract).
Kittiwake: With a tern-like wingbeat, the blacklegged kittiwake is highly maneuverable, and able to land on narrow ledges in strong winds.
Blacklegged ticks, the only ticks that carry Lyme disease, are identified by the red-orange crescent shield on their backs.
Blacklegged deer ticks can spread Lyme disease to pets, which causes fever, decreased appetite, painful joints, limping and lethargy.
In addition, a team of scientists led by Taal Levi of Oregon State University and Richard Ostfeld of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies analyzed 19 years of data on blacklegged ticks in the Northeast.
April 21, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- For the first time, blacklegged (deer) ticks have now been observed in all 67 counties of Pennsylvania, according to researchers at The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).
Blacklegged ticks, formerly known as the deer tick, remain active throughout our area.
To the Editor: In northwestern California, USA, the western blacklegged tick, Ixodes pacificus, is a known vector of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.
The researcher has also found that isolongifolenone repels blacklegged ticks and lone star ticks as effectively as DEET.