smudging

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smudging

A term of art referring to the deposition of soot from partially burnt gases from a discharged firearm.

smudging

(smŭj′ĭng)
A speech defect in which difficult consonants are omitted.

smudging (smuˑ·jing),

n in Native American medicine, the ritual of purifying the location, patient, healer, helpers and ritual objects by using the smoke obtained by burning sacred plants, such as sage, sweetgrass, and cedar. It alters the state of consciousness and enhances sensitivity. This altered sensitivity to imbalances in the spiritual and energetic realms is necessary for the healer to assess and treat an illness. Cleansing often initiates healing sessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
in its annual music poll bestowed album-of-the year honors on "The Blackening.
Command considered adding its own in-house black-oxide finishing system in the past, but a growing preference for shiny shank toolholders and other factors caused a drop in blackening needs until a few years ago.
7) Infections that can cause blackening of the esophageal mucosa include Canadida (8) and herpes (9) infections.
Consumers who have purchased Porcelain Potpourri Simmer Pots are urged not to burn the candle because of the possibility of excessive flame or blackening.
I decided to focus on the hen party and also the blackening, which is a very strong tradition in the north-east.
I will risk the wrath of the inventor by proclaiming that a slightly less vigorous approach will allow you to do a fine job of blackening with only an ordinary exhaust fan and filter over your cooktop.
Also to claim she had reached this state after 18 months is patently absurd, smokers take 20 to 30 years with direct inhalation of the tar to come close to the internal blackening she describes.
Vegetation dryness has been measured at levels far beyond the levels considered critical, and nearly 30,000 acres of brush have already burned this summer in the hills between Santa Clarita and Palmdale, with the most recent wildfire blackening more than 100 acres last weekend.
Francis Dam collapsed and killed entire families, a wind-fueled fire ravaged the small cemetery where some of the victims are buried, blackening headstones and turning wood crosses to ash.