black-eyed Susan

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Related to black-eyed Susans: coneflowers

black-eyed Susan

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Creepy and compelling, Black-Eyed Susans is a shadowy and crooked journey to a very dark place indeed, a twisty fairytale that deceives you just when you think you've cracked it and a thriller to make you remember why you love thrillers.
This Black-eyed Susan, Thunbergia alata Blushing Susie, is also grown as annual although it is a perennial climber.
Native wildflowers such as black-eyed susans and phlox also bring them in, as does the aptly named bee balm, a hardy, spreading perennial that Native Americans used for tea.
Unlike other black-eyed Susans, 'Prairie Sun' has pale green centers surrounded by 3- to 6-inch-wide daisies.
If orange is your color of choice and you have decided to plant orange Profusion zinnias in a sunny bed, offset by orange marigolds and orange Mexican sunflowers (Tithonia rotundifolia), you could also add orange black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia hirta) to the mix.
As if to affirm the difficulty of overcoming what the editors refer to as "Euro-American standards set by the dominant discourse," Puschmann-Nalenz lets drop an all-too-familiar judgment when she archly proclaims Terry McMillan's introduction to Breaking Ice (1990) more wanting in "level[s] of abstraction" than Mary Helen Washington's introduction to Black-Eyed Susans (1975/1990).
Oak, pitch pine, and beach plum joined perennial grasses and Indian nutgrass, native aster, and black-eyed Susans, among other wildflowers.
While Georgians are accustomed to blossoming Black-eyed Susans, Cosmos and Poppies, Georgia DOT landscape architects decided to do something new.
Plenty of pretty perennials, such as coneflowers and black-eyed Susans, require little tending and offer cheery blooms throughout the growing season.
The photo contains black-eyed susans, impatiens, and marigolds as well as a headless sculpture and a cat with glowing eyes.
Given in marriage by a very proud father, and followed down the natural sloping hillside aisle by her beloved Pomeranian, Jessica met her groom beneath a magnificent oak tree whose branches held 35-inch circular kissing balls made of sunflowers and black-eyed Susans.
Sweeps of golden black-eyed Susans and lavender 'First Love' dianthus on the left contrast with fountains of zebra grass at the rear.