bivariate


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Related to bivariate: Bivariate distribution, bivariate analysis

bivariate

(bī-văr′ē-ĭt, āt″) [″ + ″]
Pertaining to two variables.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though bivariate analyses at this level are normally restricted to side-by-side column graphs (ACARA, 2013, p.
Bivariate analysis was performed on 1 136 study participants for whom complete data on incontinence outcomes were available.
However, unlike the double hurdle model, a bivariate estimator is more readily available.
However, research conducted with random samples of MSW-holding NASW members found gender and age to be insignificant (Berkman & Zinberg, 1997; Crisp, 2006; Green, 2005), except concerning heterosexism at the bivariate level (Berkman & Zinberg, 1997).
These analysis procedures were carried out for the bivariate binormal and critical illness data sets.
For each country of our sample we first estimate three bivariate panel VAR models, each including one labour market variable (labour market regulation, union density and wage coordination successively) and unemployment.
To account for these differences, this paper uses a rich set of covariates, including multiple measures of health and attitudes, and bivariate probit regressions to account for unobserved differences.
In the multivariate analysis, none of the significant variables after bivariate analysis was related to performance (Table 2).
Table 2 summarizes bivariate analyses between AA membership and other study variables.
While the two-map approach puts the estimate and quality information separately on two frames of display, the bivariate legend approach, the preferred method suggested by MacEachren et al.
Before discussing the bivariate probit results, we provide some evidence on the validity of these exclusion restrictions by examining correlations with having a home computer and high school graduation (reported in Table 4).
Participants in the study also indicated whether they found the people in the pictures to appear "baby-faced" or "mature," and the researchers calculated bivariate correlations between "baby-facedness" and the four aforementioned facial traits.