bisexual

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bisexual

 [bi-sek´shoo-al]
1. of or pertaining to bisexuality; see also ambisexual and unisexual.
2. an individual exhibiting bisexuality.

bi·sex·u·al

(bī-sek'shū-ăl),
1. Having gonads of both sexes.
See also: hermaphroditism.
2. Denoting a person who engages in both heterosexual and homosexual activities.

bisexual

/bi·sex·u·al/ (-sek´shoo-al)
1. pertaining to or characterized by bisexuality.
2. an individual exhibiting bisexuality.
3. pertaining to or characterized by hermaphroditism.
4. pertaining to or characterized by androgyny.

bisexual

(bī-sĕk′sho͞o-əl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to both sexes.
2.
a. Having both male and female reproductive organs; hermaphroditic.
b. Botany Denoting a single flower that contains functional staminate and pistillate structures; perfect.
3. Of, relating to, or having a sexual orientation to persons of either sex.
n.
1. A bisexual organism; a hermaphrodite.
2. A bisexual person.

bi′sex·u·al′i·ty (-ăl′ĭ-tē) n.

bisexual

[bīsek′sho̅o̅·əl]
Etymology: L, bis + sexus, male or female
1 hermaphroditic; having gonads of both sexes.
2 possessing physical or psychological characteristics of both sexes.
3 engaging in both heterosexual and homosexual activity.
4 desiring sexual contact with persons of both sexes.

bisexual

adjective
(1) Having a sexual attraction to/engaging in sexual intercourse with both hetero- and homosexual partners.
(2) Having both male and female sexual characteristics or orientation.
(3) Of both sexes; hermaphroditic; as a flower with stamens and pistil, or an animal with ovaries and testes.

noun A person who engages in both homo- and heterosexual activity.

bisexual

adjective
1. Having both ♂ and ♀ sexual characteristics or orientation.
2. Of both sexes; hermaphroditic; as a flower with stamens and pistil, or an animal with ovaries and testes noun A person who engages in both homo– and heterosexual activity. Cf Heterosexual, Homosexual.

bi·sex·u·al

(bī-sek'shū-ăl)
1. Having gonads of both sexes.
See also: hermaphroditism
2. Denoting a person attracted to members of both sexes.

bisexual

1. Pertaining to BISEXUALITY.
2. A person who manifests bisexuality.

bisexual

  1. of or relating to HERMAPHRODITE individuals.
  2. of or relating to a population that contains both males and females.

bisexual

1. having gonads of both sexes.
2. hermaphrodite.
3. having both active and passive sexual interests or characteristics.
4. capable of the function of both sexes.
5. both heterosexual and homosexual.
6. a patient which is both heterosexual and homosexual.
7. of, relating to, or involving both sexes, as bisexual reproduction.

Patient discussion about bisexual

Q. HOW DO I KNOW IF IM BISEXUAL? I WAS WITH HER ONLY ONCE...THOSE DA CONSIDER ME BISEXUAL?

A. thanxs...very helpful...wInk

More discussions about bisexual
References in periodicals archive ?
Logistic regression analyses that controlled for ethnicity, age and school type revealed that bisexually active youths had significantly higher odds of having had an STD (odds ratio, 5.
3, respectively), but homosexually and bisexually active males were less likely than heterosexually active males to have received AIDS education (0.
Finally, the investigators found significant differences in how the three groups reported sexual identity: Bisexually active teenagers indicated a spread of identities (31% heterosexual, 11% homosexual, 35% bisexual and 23% unsure or none), whereas most other students indicated a heterosexual identity (96% and 69% of those reporting heterosexual and homosexual experience, respectively).
Although the researchers acknowledge that the terms "sexual contact" and "sexual intercourse" were not defined in the survey and that the study was limited to a public high school setting, they conclude that male adolescents who are bisexually active display higher levels of AiDS-related risk behavior than do other adolescents.
Eight clusters of bisexually active men were formed.
Men were considered bisexually active (BA) if they reported oral, vaginal or anal sex with a woman at least once over this period, independent of their sexual activity with men.
A second test among the two bisexually active (BA) groups looked at the proportion of each group that recurrently reported bisexual activity.
In our study, all three bisexual groups showed greater odds of involvement in various aspects of trading sex and in the two bisexually defined groups, greater odds of injection drug use.
In our study, trading sex and injection drug use appeared to overlap considerably within the two bisexually defined groups compared to the referent GDHA group.
In line with this reasoning, our results are indicative of another trait associated with male bisexuality in HIV research, notably, a lesser degree of emotional involvement with other MSM, which could deflect bisexually defined men from perceiving the pertinence of prevention activities oriented towards gay men.
For example, our study did not address investment in masculinity, which could provide another tentative explanation for the bisexually defined group's apparent lesser involvement with other MSM.
In contrast with the two bisexually defined groups, the constellation of features particular to the gay defined bisexually active group (GDBA) seems to confirm yet another variant of male bisexuality underscored by HIV researchers, namely youthful sexual experimentation.