bisalbuminemia

bis·al·bu·mi·ne·mi·a

(bis'al-byū'mi-nē'mē-ă),
The concurrence of having two kinds of serum albumin that differ in mobility on electrophoresis: normal albumin (albumin A) and any one of several variant types that migrate at other speeds; people are heterozygous for the gene for albumin A and the gene for the variant albumin type.
See also: inherited albumin variants.

bisalbuminemia

[bis′albyoo͡m′inē′mē·ə]
a condition in which two types of albumin exist in an individual. The two types are expressed by heterozygous alleles of the albumin gene and are detected by differences in the mobility of the types on electrophoretic gels.

bisalbuminemia

(bis″al-bū″mĭ-nēm′ē-ă) [ bi- + albuminemia]
The presence to two distinct forms of albumin in the blood. It is a familial condition found occasionally in on protein electrophoresis, but it is not associated with disease.

bisalbuminemia

a congenital abnormality marked by the presence of two distinct serum albumins that differ in mobility on electrophoresis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The albumin peak is split; this phenomenon is known as bisalbuminemia or alloalbuminemia.
Bisalbuminemia is usually caused by an albumin variant that differs from the most common allotype, albumin A, by a single amino acid residue, thereby producing 2 albumin fractions of equal or unequal amounts.
This pattern could potentially be confused with bisalbuminemia, an uncommon inherited condition in which 2 albumin allelic variants have different migrational properties.
Bisalbuminemia (or alloalbuminemia) is a rare inherited or acquired condition characterized by the occurrence of 2 circulating components that are observed, typically, during routine clinical electrophoresis or in genetic surveys.
Improved sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis for detection of bisalbuminemia.
Inherited bisalbuminemia with benign monoclonal gammopathy detected by capillary but not agarose gel electrophoresis.
Bisalbuminemia (or alloalbuminemia) is characterized by the presence of two albumin components (in equal or unequal amounts) on serum protein electrophoresis (1).
We recently encountered a patient with both bisalbuminemia and monoclonal paraprotein.
Whereas genetic variants of Alb apparently lack clinical relevance (27), one form of bisalbuminemia caused by abnormal cleavage of the Alb propeptide in cases of pancreatic disease mimics anodal bisalbuminemia (28) and would be detectable by these algorithms.
Improved sensitivity of capillary zone electrophoresis for detection of bisalbuminemia [Letter].
We wish to report our findings on bisalbuminemia detected by capillary electrophoresis.
Albumin is probably the most commonly measured serum protein, and genetic variation, or bisalbuminemia, is usually detected by electrophoresis of plasma collected for diagnostic reasons.