birthrate


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Related to birthrate: fertility rate

birthrate

also

birth rate

(bûrth′rāt′)
n.
The ratio of total live births to total population in a specified community or area over a specified period of time. The birthrate is often expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 of the population per year. Also called natality.

birth·rate

(bĭrth'rāt)
A summary rate based on the number of live births in a population over a given period, usually 1 year; the numerator is the number of live births, the denominator is the midyear population.
References in periodicals archive ?
But here's the good news: Teenage birthrates have plunged by 52 percent since 1991 -- one of America's great social policy successes, coming even as inequality and family breakdown have worsened.
Nonetheless it expressed alarm about population decline, especially when the birthrate fell to record lows in the 1930s, and funded maternity and child welfare centers.
Finally, the demographic characteristics of the population are associated with the birthrate, but not with the abortion rate.
In light of racial differences in response to these policies, the analyses assessed the birthrates of whites and nonwhites separately.
Judy said an important aspect of Birthrate Plus is that it takes into account variations in case mix.
The government's National Council on Social Security has compiled a final report on how to better address problems regarding pension systems, medical and nursing care services and the declining birthrate, as well as how much these reforms would cost.
Mr Jones said the unit was having to cope with a 6% increase in the birthrate and a major rebuild of the Cardiff hospital's women's unit, to be ready next year.
Midwife recruitment in the North-east and Yorkshire has fallen while birthrates are climbing according to a survey from the Royal College of Midwives.
It said the nation's falling birthrate is an ongoing, nationwide trend with some regional variations.
Instead, my guess is Liverpool City Council's decision last week had more to do with the fact that the city's birthrate is falling alarmingly fast.
But the immigration that is occurring is primarily from Latin America, while the birthrate among the Latino population is higher -- 2.
The government saw that the erosion of French-Canadian culture was tied to this trend--as the birthrate fell, so did the culture and the possibility of a viable separate nation.