birth parent

(redirected from birthparent)
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birth parent

also

birthparent

(bûrth′pâr′ənt, -păr′-)
n.
One's biological parent.

birth parent

one of an individual's two biological parents.
The parent who conceived a child

birth parent

Biological parent, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus and Women: --A woman, not If Eve remained Jesus went "Although in a a man, was sin forever, against culture minority, at chosen by God why was Mary, a and spoke to a all times of to be the human daughter of Samaritan biblical birthparent of Eve, chosen to woman-she was history there Jesus.
A birthparent loses a child; the adoptee loses biological connections; and infertile adoptive parents lose the hope for biological children.
In addition, the endowment provides a post-adoption counselor to assist with serving the needs of birthparents after placement throughout their lifetime.
To learn more about Bethany's family preservation and adoption services, view the following birthparents video featuring Catelynn and Tyler at http://vimeo.
The effects of maternal depression in birthparents and adverse outcomes in children have been documented (for example, Hay, Pawlby, Sharp, Asten, Mills, & Kumar, 2001; Zajicek-Farber, 2009; Dietz, Donahue, Kelley, & Marshal, 2009; Weinberg, Olson, Beeghly, & Tronick, 2006).
Second, adolescents in stepfather families are at greater risk for adjustment problems than those living with two birthparents, which may be due to higher levels of stress felt among stepfamilies or differences in parenting (Hetherington, 2006).
The conference was seen by the UAI as a 'pro-adoption lobby with the intention to establish a European Law for fast track adoption where the rights and interests of birthparents and adoptees have no consideration' (United Adoptees International, 2010), despite its expressed aim of ensuring the best interests of the child.
does not negate curiosity about their birthparents.
A vital resource for all those involved in adoption policy and practice--legislators and policymakers, adoption practitioners and child welfare advocates, birthparents, adoptive parents and people who were adopted into their families--NCFA's 480-page Adoption Factbook IV is said to be the most comprehensive source of adoption facts and statistics.
Assumptions (by adoption advocates) that children are better off than with their birthparents are often coupled with the argument that if poorer nations were truly concerned with the real needs of children they would support international adoption.
At these times, adoptees may wonder whether birthparents are thinking of them and how they would react to these milestones (Issues Facing Adult Adoptees, n.
By the 1960s, however, the overwhelming majority of birthparents who surrendered children were single mothers.