birth parent

(redirected from birthparent)
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birth parent

also

birthparent

(bûrth′pâr′ənt, -păr′-)
n.
One's biological parent.

birth parent

one of an individual's two biological parents.
The parent who conceived a child

birth parent

Biological parent, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jesus and Women: --A woman, not If Eve remained Jesus went "Although in a a man, was sin forever, against culture minority, at chosen by God why was Mary, a and spoke to a all times of to be the human daughter of Samaritan biblical birthparent of Eve, chosen to woman-she was history there Jesus.
A birthparent loses a child; the adoptee loses biological connections; and infertile adoptive parents lose the hope for biological children.
In addition, the endowment provides a post-adoption counselor to assist with serving the needs of birthparents after placement throughout their lifetime.
For example, some of the feedback that I've received from couples that chose foster care was that even though you may be working with an LGBT-friendly agency, there's a possibility that you'll have interactions with the child's birthparents and/or family members and they may not be so accepting.
The adoption alternative is not even on the radar screen for most young women today who are struggling to choose between abortion and parenting, and more public support is necessary to reverse this course and to provide validation for birthparents who do make a responsible adoption plan voluntarily.
He soon begins to wonder about what his birthparents might be like, which stirs a wealth of emotions inside him.
You both could benefit from checking the information and online discussion forums offered through Concerned United Birthparents (cubirthparents.
Original birth certificates are made available to adoptees age eighteen or older upon request, and birthparents may file a non-binding Contact Preference Form, requesting direct contact, contact through an intermediary, or no contact at all.
As Oedipus anxiously relates, years ago he had received a similar prophecy and fled down the highway from Delphi, away from his presumed birthparents in Corinth.
The effects of maternal depression in birthparents and adverse outcomes in children have been documented (for example, Hay, Pawlby, Sharp, Asten, Mills, & Kumar, 2001; Zajicek-Farber, 2009; Dietz, Donahue, Kelley, & Marshal, 2009; Weinberg, Olson, Beeghly, & Tronick, 2006).
Fiction or memoir, the stories can be narrated in the first person by adoptees, adoptive parents, birthparents, or a combination.
Second, adolescents in stepfather families are at greater risk for adjustment problems than those living with two birthparents, which may be due to higher levels of stress felt among stepfamilies or differences in parenting (Hetherington, 2006).