birth parent


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birth parent

also

birthparent

(bûrth′pâr′ənt, -păr′-)
n.
One's biological parent.

birth parent

one of an individual's two biological parents.
The parent who conceived a child

birth parent

Biological parent, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harrell of Catholic Charities in Arlington often encounters prospective parents who are worried about birth parents and what kind of presence they may have in an adopted child's life.
Randall, her husband, George, and their son's birth parents remain in close contact.
Other factors that contributed to the connection of birth family members and adoptive parents over time included a decreased fear of the birth parent reclaiming the child.
The sample consisted of 20 adoptees (four men and 16 women), ranging in age from 26 to 71 years (8) (the average age was 38 years), with 10 to 26 years having passed since initial reunion with at least one birth parent.
The very fact that an individual was conceived by assisted reproductive techniques was hidden from that individual, and strict donor anonymity ensured that both donor offspring (2) and their birth parents (3) would never know the identity of the donor(s).
Fully open adoptions are those in which birth parents choose from a list of applicants the family that will raise their child.
Records have been unavailable in most states to adopted children who want information about their birth parents.
Surprisingly, if adoptive parents are simply willing to discuss the situation as honestly as they can when a child asks about his or her birth parents, the child's anxieties often are alleviated and the issue is dropped.
Foster parents often observe problematic behavior in their foster children before, during or after visits with birth parents.
Proponents of open adoption, on the other hand, assert that meeting the adopting parents and maintaining contact with the adopting family puts a birth parent's mind at ease (Baran & Pannor, 1990, 1993; Bradbury & Marsh, 1988; Gritter, 1997; Lindsay, 1987; Silber & Speedlin, 1982), enables the birth parent to see that the child is alive and well, and thus facilitates the grieving process.
Just five months short of the 1950 ruling declaring a cessation of all ties between adopted children and their biological families, the Supreme Court seconded this, ruling that although a dopters were normally liable for their children's support, when it had been proven that an adoptive parent was not in a position to support the child, the court could seek support from the birth parent.
I understand her mum's reluctance, particularly if her father abandoned them, but I'm adopted and I understand that need to meet a birth parent.