birth pangs


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

birth pangs

pl.n.
1. The repetitive pains occurring in childbirth.
2. Difficulty or turmoil associated with a development or transition: the birth pangs of an emergent democracy.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Having witnessed the birth pangs of the Sofia Film Fest, I can vouch that it is never easy to break new ground, but that only makes success taste sweeter.
Gordon Brown yesterday said the current crisis was "the difficult birth pangs of a new global order" and said new measures had to be put in place to prevent a repeat in the future.
He said current "threats and challenges" to the world economy should be seen as "the difficult birth pangs of a new global order".
The birth pangs of devolution could not have been more problematic.
Where our humanity alone counts because we feel only our own pain as the birth pangs take hold.
The recent statement by US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice during a fleeting stopover in Beirut - that the situation in Lebanon represented the birth pangs of a "new Middle East" - is being juxtaposed with the mounting carnage to rally popular opposition against all things American.
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Friday that the current conflict represents "the birth pangs of a new Middle East.
Confronted by death in its myriad forms, how often we yearn for a return to the past, to maintain the status quo, to see the fulfillment of our vision, or to find some relief from the birth pangs of Easter living, rather than longing for new life.
Observers can record the birth pangs of stars in our own galactic neighborhood as well as the faint glow from the most distant objects in the universe.
Jeanneret shows how the birth pangs of vernacular languages convey the same mobilities, and how the works fashioned in the melting pot of classical and vernacular idioms can be likened to cinematic montages.
Just a sampling of the fundamental questions we have to answer give a clear indication of profound changes yet to come as the birth pangs of the church of the third millennium continue.
Writing to the Marquis de Lafayette about the birth pangs of the American Republic, Thomas Jefferson said, ``We are not expected to be translated from despotism to liberty in a feather bed.