birth mother

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birth mother

also

birthmother

(bûrth′mŭth′ər)
n.
One's biological mother.

birth mother

the biological mother or woman who bears a child. The child may have been conceived in a surrogate mother with sperm of the biological father.
A woman who carries a baby to term and delivers it

birth mother

Biological mother, genetic mother, natural mother Reproductive medicine A ♀ who carries a baby to term, who she plans to give up for adoption. See Baby M, Surrogacy Social medicine The ♀ who, with the birth father conceived a child, carried the pregnancy to term and delivered, then subsequently placed the child for adoption.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adoption Network Law Center is not an adoption agency, but the largest law center in the US assisting Adoptive Parents and Birth Mothers in their adoption plans.
Opponents contend birth mothers were promised privacy in perpetuity, which Donaldson Institute research has not been able to substantiate, and research shows both adopted children and the parents who gave them up want contact, Pertman said.
The adoptive mother invited her 15-year-old daughter's birth mother to live with them for a few months.
At wave 2, birth mothers reported currently having custody of 84% of their children.
If the adoptee has the financial means, hiring an outside investigative agency may be the best route to acquiring details about the location of the birth mother.
When it comes time to speak to the birth mother, you can avoid having to ask the tough questions: leave that to your adoption professional, who talks every day with birth mothers about touchy subjects and, as your buffer and with her permission, will pass the information on to you.
But critics claim the system allows birth mothers to sell their babies for profit, and even some adoptive parents worry that their babies might have come to them through unethical means.
This study reveals that at least some birth mothers have entered into the reunion with unrealistic expectations about bonding (or is it re-bonding?
One of the birth mothers of the revolution, Susan Sontag, wrote in 1967, "The white race is the cancer of human history.
In stories of adoptive parents, adoptees, and birth mothers, she traces the crumbling consensus that adoption was "the best solution" to illegitimacy and infertility.
Most birth mothers have open adoptions where they are allowed to keep in touch with the children.
The Independent Adoption Center (see below) specializes in "open adoption" (where birth mothers choose the people who will adopt their baby, and the children grow up knowing that they are adopted and who their birth mother is).