birth mother

(redirected from birth mothers)
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birth mother

also

birthmother

(bûrth′mŭth′ər)
n.
One's biological mother.

birth mother

the biological mother or woman who bears a child. The child may have been conceived in a surrogate mother with sperm of the biological father.
A woman who carries a baby to term and delivers it

birth mother

Biological mother, genetic mother, natural mother Reproductive medicine A ♀ who carries a baby to term, who she plans to give up for adoption. See Baby M, Surrogacy Social medicine The ♀ who, with the birth father conceived a child, carried the pregnancy to term and delivered, then subsequently placed the child for adoption.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some chose the name that their birth mothers had originally given them.
Councils across the country have adopted policies of acting as intermediaries between birth mothers and their children, offering counselling and arranging contact between both parties or at least giving "essential" information to let mothers know their children are safe and well.
Van Sleet and Orlet founded the support group to help birth mothers deal with these problems and to help them find their children, if they wish.
It may well be that if asked to explain themselves, the legislators, and the Uniform Law Commissioners whose statute they were adopting, would have stated that they treated birth mothers as the legal mothers because they are genetically related to their children.
The law was approved in hopes of giving desperate birth mothers an option to abandoning their babies to die.
Melosh superbly interprets the dynamics of unplanned pregnancy from the perspective of both the white birth mother and social workers, especially in presenting the spectrum of birth mothers' responses to this controversial issue.
Instead of a child-focused adoption book, Melosh is primarily concerned with the experiences of birth mothers and adoptive parents and she shows how their experiences reflect American society's views and the social issues surrounding adoption.
Most birth mothers have open adoptions where they are allowed to keep in touch with the children.
The 31-year-old sales executive from the New York City area and her partner of ten years, social worker Sharon Cuff, favored international adoption because foreign birth mothers cannot rescind their decisions and because they knew that U.
Though the children -- all adoptees -- called only their adopted mother "mom," their birth mothers were also present to share the moment.
com unlawfully discriminates by excluding all same-sex couples from using its services, one of which allows prospective adoptive parents, for a fee, to post personal information about themselves for birth mothers who are seeking adoptive parents for their children.
Motherhood Silenced is a welcome addition to existing research studies about the experiences of birth mothers who, through social stigma and pressure, had no choice but to place their illegitimate child for adoption.