birth mother


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birth mother

also

birthmother

(bûrth′mŭth′ər)
n.
One's biological mother.

birth mother

the biological mother or woman who bears a child. The child may have been conceived in a surrogate mother with sperm of the biological father.
A woman who carries a baby to term and delivers it

birth mother

Biological mother, genetic mother, natural mother Reproductive medicine A ♀ who carries a baby to term, who she plans to give up for adoption. See Baby M, Surrogacy Social medicine The ♀ who, with the birth father conceived a child, carried the pregnancy to term and delivered, then subsequently placed the child for adoption.
References in periodicals archive ?
He says his birth mother gave him up for adoption a chi mother g
Another mother also expressed dismay over a letter from the birth mother of her teenage daughter:
At wave 2, birth mothers reported currently having custody of 84% of their children.
When it comes time to speak to the birth mother, you can avoid having to ask the tough questions: leave that to your adoption professional, who talks every day with birth mothers about touchy subjects and, as your buffer and with her permission, will pass the information on to you.
two birth fathers had died prior to the adoptees' reunion with the birth mother
When Tira's birth mother was approximately four months pregnant, she asked me whether I had considered breastfeeding Tira.
According to the Act, the birth mother will be given full parental responsibility for the child.
The Independent Adoption Center (see below) specializes in "open adoption" (where birth mothers choose the people who will adopt their baby, and the children grow up knowing that they are adopted and who their birth mother is).
My birth mother had had another child who was infected.
Niko's search leads her to her real father but also to an unexpected and shocking secret about her real birth mother.
You may also recall the brutal custody battle between Megan Marie LaFlamme's birth mother and her adoptive parents in 1992.
But Ms Leigh Chambers, from the British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, which offers advice to councils on adoption, warned that in some cases contact between the birth mother and the child she gave up for adoption could be harmful.