biparental


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Related to biparental: biparental inheritance

biparental

 [bi″pah-ren´t'l]
derived from two parents, male and female.

bi·pa·ren·tal

(bī'pa-ren'tăl),
Having two parents, male and female.

biparental

(bī′pə-rĕn′tl)
adj.
Of or derived from two parents: biparental inheritance.

biparental

adjective Referring to two parents.

bi·pa·ren·tal

(bī'păr-ent'ăl)
Having two parents.

biparental

derived from two parents, male and female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ten biparental families of Pinctada margaritifera, produced in the Ifremer hatchery facilities in Vairao (Tahiti, French Polynesia), were used in a graft experiment (Ky et al.
34) Finally, mosaicism for androgenetic and biparental cell lines can be confused with PHM both on histologic evaluation and on microsatellite genotyping.
Among the strengths of the study are that the group was ethnically homogeneous, had an economic level above the provincial average, and most had a biparental family structure.
This latter category is further divided into four types of insect societies: maternal and biparental care, paternal care, fortress defense, and herds.
Biparental failure in the childhood experience of borderline patients.
Biparental reproduction is necessary because of epigenetic modifications (such as imprinting) that occur during gametogenesis.
In fact, the plastid function of some cells is to support the formation of other cells--for example, the tapetum and the vegetative cell--whereas others, especially sperm cells, sometimes contain plastids responsible for biparental cytoplasmic inheritance and thus are directly involved in the reproductive process.
This so-called biparental care (by both parents) proved important to survival of the of[spring and in cases where the male disappeared, the deserted female magpie-lark invariably abandoned the nest.
Cristol, College of William and Mary, "A novel approach to examining incubation behavior of a biparental avian species.
The 3 months of biparental care of their single altricial chick is followed by 9-14 months of uniparental care by the mother (Diamond, 1972, 1973; osorno, 1999; Osorno and Szekely, 2004).
11) Previous findings have shown that patients with recurrent HM can have biparental molar rather than typical androgenetic HM, which might be familial or sporadic.